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JUNE 2020 WRESTLING DISCUSSION

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40 minutes ago, AxB said:

Top 7 Reasons why the Empty Arena/ Wrestlers ringside Covid-era wrestling is better than when there was crowds:

  1. No obnoxious, attention seeking fans trying to get themselves over.

 

 

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44 minutes ago, Infinit said:

No more endless dumb crowd reaction shots spliced in between the action.

Unfortunately with WWE having PC students and some NXT folks in the crowd they've gone back to that already.  I'm not saying it doesn't happen with AEW but it just seems more noticeable with WWE shows.

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It's a very specific WWE production illness. It went downhill after the"Taker loses at Mania" reaction shots.

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Reportedly WWE is gonna redesign both NXT mens title and the US title. NXT title will be the same but just bigger. While the US title gets a new design.

Or maybe nothing changes.

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5 minutes ago, D.Z said:

Reportedly WWE is gonna redesign both NXT mens title and the US title. NXT title will be the same but just bigger. While the US title gets a new design.

Or maybe nothing changes.

As if Cole doesn't look ridiculous enough....

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Maybe the larger redesign is a sign of Cole's reign of terror coming to an end?

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Posted (edited)

I've been watching Japanese pro-wrestling for some 20+ years, but thanks to @D.Z I learned something new and I'm not sure it's common knowledge as most of the time folks mostly just talk about match reviews and results and not about history in detail. He mentioned the term pro-wrestling shitenno a little bit ago and I remember going back and forth with him on the topic, but he never went much into detail.

Shitenno means four heavenly kings. Before Baba passed, he wanted Misawa, Kawada, Kobashi and Taue who are also referred to as the Four Pillars, to create a new in ring style in which they could get away from the previous era of matches being bloody brawls with foreigners relying heavily on the use of weapons and the matches ending in no contest, DQ's and count outs. The Four Pillars began developing the head drop heavy style as they thought that was the best way for them to beat each other to the point of exhaustion and being able to win clean by pinfall.

Of course Akiyama was later added to that group and they were called gokyo which means Top 5 and after the All Japan and Noah split, Misawa, Kobashi, Akiyama and Takayama became the four pillars of Noah.

That bit of history is something kind of missing for a lot of foreign fans who've been following for years as we mostly just got best of comps. in the tape trading community and a lot of folks didn't really bother with full TV blocks or year sets back then.

Also, I had no idea Steve Williams' backdrop was called the satsujin backdrop which translates to murder backdrop as it was a high-angle backdrop which is news to me.

Anyway, just thought I'd share that bit of meaningless nerdy trivia with you folks.

Edited by Edwin
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7 hours ago, Beech27 said:

An anonymous listener wrote in to tell the story of Omega attending a 2005 camp hosted by Harley Race/Pro Wrestling NOAH. It goes that Omega messed up a warm-up leapfrog spot and accidentally headbutted his partner. Because of this and a general feeling he was working too fast and messy, he was shunted into the beginner section of the camp.

Also, he and Dakota were something like the tenth pair to do that drill, so Kenny should have known it by the time they got in, and it prompted Harley to yell at him for not paying attention. 

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2 minutes ago, Edwin said:

Also, I had no idea Steve Williams' backdrop was called the satsujin backdrop which translates to murder backdrop as it was a high-angle backdrop which is news to me.

I always recall it being referred to as the murderous backdrop. 

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1 minute ago, Eivion said:

I always recall it being referred to as the murderous backdrop. 

Same, but I'm pretty sure I got that from Fire Pro

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24 minutes ago, Eivion said:

I always recall it being referred to as the murderous backdrop. 

A lot of folks called it a backdrop driver.

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7 minutes ago, Edwin said:

A lot of folks called it a backdrop driver.

I've heard both. Thought Backdrop Driver was just the technical name.

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On 6/6/2020 at 8:32 AM, Mike Campbell said:

Cornette's interview with FTR on his podcast was fan-fucking-tastic. Anyone, whether they're in the business or not, interested in the artform or technical side of tag team wrestling ought to give it a listen.

I gave this a listen and enjoyed them talking about how ridiculous working for WWE a lot of the time was, but then they began trying to work on the podcast saying their agreement with AEW was a handshake deal and they felt disrespected by Cody for something he said on a podcast and how they got into fights with the cops and such and yeah...

tumblr_mnn50r2s4K1sosawio1_400.gif

It's cool they tried to work after the WWE talk, but it was cringy and it just seemed like they were working the rest of the podcast to please Cornette.

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The Ricky Morton story sounded fishy as fuck too, tbh, but the fact it wasn't instantly mocked on social media by anyone makes me wonder.

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24 minutes ago, Death From Above said:

The Ricky Morton story sounded fishy as fuck too, tbh, but the fact it wasn't instantly mocked on social media by anyone makes me wonder.

Yeah. The context of this for anyone who hasn't listened to it -- Ricky Morton was a guest coach at the PC and no one cared for him or seeked advice from him aside from FTR and one of them put over Morton for being a legend and a HOFer and they began crying as they put Morton over due to the lack of recognition he had received.

A lot of folks shifted the entire podcast as a work setting up for Cornette eventually making an AEW appearance and managing FTR for massive heat. Not sure if that will be the case or not, but that was the sentiment from a lot of people.

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I can see him managing them on an Indy show (like whenever Bobby Fulton reschedules his show from March), but I’d think he would alienate a certain percentage of his audience if he works for AEW. Of course, if Tony’s check is big enough, maybe the trade off is worth it. 

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The moment Cornette shows up is the moment I'm done with a promotion.

 

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I think AEW would alienate a large chunk of their audience if Cornette showed up. 

That said 2020 has been so crazy it wouldn’t surprise me if by year end we had The Bucks (w/Meltzer) v FTR (w/Cornette) - Scaffold Match, where the Bucks win after a Vince Russo run in with his new team, the debuting Enzo & Cass.

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I don't remember Mongo showing up in WWF. They mentioned in the comments he was part of the Lawrence Taylor vs. Bam Bam Bigelow setup, so it would make sense, but my only recollection of Mongo in wrestling was the WCW run, of course.

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He did commentary on Raw in the lead up to WM11.

 

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He even gets to cut a backstage promo at WM XI. He seemed really comfortable in a wrestling role compared to the other football guys who sounded like they were doing promos in front of their bathroom mirror. At a time when both big US companies were searching for outside credibility, he became a commodity. Unfortunately, that would give Eric Bischoff the greenlight to put this dude in the booth and then into a wrestling ring.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Edwin said:

I've been watching Japanese pro-wrestling for some 20+ years, but thanks to @D.Z I learned something new and I'm not sure it's common knowledge as most of the time folks mostly just talk about match reviews and results and not about history in detail. He mentioned the term pro-wrestling shitenno a little bit ago and I remember going back and forth with him on the topic, but he never went much into detail.

Shitenno means four heavenly kings. Before Baba passed, he wanted Misawa, Kawada, Kobashi and Taue who are also referred to as the Four Pillars, to create a new in ring style in which they could get away from the previous era of matches being bloody brawls with foreigners relying heavily on the use of weapons and the matches ending in no contest, DQ's and count outs. The Four Pillars began developing the head drop heavy style as they thought that was the best way for them to beat each other to the point of exhaustion and being able to win clean either by pinfall or submission.

Of course Akiyama was later added to that group and they were called gokyo which means Top 5 and after the All Japan and Noah split, Misawa, Kobashi, Akiyama and Takayama became the four pillars of Noah.

That bit of history is something kind of missing for a lot of foreign fans who've been following for years as we mostly just got best of comps. in the tape trading community and a lot of folks didn't really bother with full TV blocks or year sets back then.

Also, I had no idea Steve Williams' backdrop was called the satsujin backdrop which translates to murder backdrop as it was a high-angle backdrop which is news to me.

Anyway, just thought I'd share that bit of meaningless nerdy trivia with you folks.

Shitennō Pro-Wrestling, the Kings battle of exceeding and dangerous skills.

Other aspects of this style besides dangerous head drops are learned reversals, rapid multiple strikes, the no sell german or exploder and other combo suplex exchanges, rare big moves, multiple finishers. Baba also stressed that pinfalls must end the match in the 90's.

My minds blurry on this but I think one Suwama vs Taiyo Kea match was trying to homage the Shitennō Pro-Wrestling style. 



 

Edited by D.Z

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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, D.Z said:

Baba also stressed that pinfalls must end the match in the 90's.

Yeah, this is one of the details I forgot to mention I had read. Baba wanted them to win by pinfall, not submission. That's why the style was physical as it was.

Edited by Edwin

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4 hours ago, Edwin said:

A lot of folks called it a backdrop driver.

I recall Takeshi Morishima's Saito suplex being called the backdrop driver.

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