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[MOVIES] DECEMBER 2018 DISCUSSION

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2 hours ago, Dolfan in NYC said:

Mortal Engines had a reported budget of somewhere between $100-$150 million (which is probably much higher than that).  

It made $7.5M in this, it's opening weekend. Now, I'm no accountant, but that does not seem like a good ROI. 

When I saw the ad for it, all I could think of was "I can't wait for this to be on How Did This Get Made?".

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39 minutes ago, Johnny Sorrow said:

When I saw the ad for it, all I could think of was "I can't wait for this to be on How Did This Get Made?".

Peter Jackson said he wanted to make another sweeping epic and the studio assumed it would have LoTR license to print money.

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55 minutes ago, Johnny Sorrow said:

When I saw the ad for it, all I could think of was "I can't wait for this to be on How Did This Get Made?".

That's what I thought too. Actually, the first time I saw the trailer for this was in front of The Last Jedi. No joke, my wife and I thought it was one of those joke trailers that turns into a Coca-Cola ad just because of how bad it looked. It then kept on going.

Yeah, it's going to be ripe for HDTGM.

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I watched Jeremy Saulnier's HOLD THE DARK on Netflix last week.  Credit for being one the few movies that doesn't give everything away in the ads.  I was definitely not expecting "FIRST BLOOD but Rambo is Michael Myers."

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On 12/4/2018 at 5:37 PM, Raziel said:

They're not wrong.  Modern TV's are default to on at 60 FPS, meanwhile movies are filmed at 24 FPS, and the TV's codec has to make up the difference, which totally screws with the way it's presented.

Cruise just doesn't want you watching his weird plastic surgery face at a higher framerate 😄

I got used to "motion smoothing" and now love it.  I said it.

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I love the Soap Opera Effect, and often fight with VFX people about it.

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You know how sometimes when you watch a film you haven't seen for ages, and there's so much to it you'd either forgotten, or you just missed it every previous time you'd watched it? I just had the exact opposite thing happen. I watched Boogie Nights for the first time this millennium, and I remembered everything.

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8 minutes ago, AxB said:

You know how sometimes when you watch a film you haven't seen for ages, and there's so much to it you'd either forgotten, or you just missed it every previous time you'd watched it? I just had the exact opposite thing happen. I watched Boogie Nights for the first time this millennium, and I remembered everything.

I saw Starship Invasions (1977) when I was nine years old.

I recently watched it again on YouTube and was astonished by how much I remembered.

I was also sad because movies with aliens and dogfighting UFOs seems a lot more awesome when you are nine years old.

 

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I thought the Mortal Engines trailer looked pretty decent but given all these reviews I'll wait to see it at a place other than the theater. Are the books its based on any good?

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10 hours ago, AxB said:

You know how sometimes when you watch a film you haven't seen for ages, and there's so much to it you'd either forgotten, or you just missed it every previous time you'd watched it? I just had the exact opposite thing happen. I watched Boogie Nights for the first time this millennium, and I remembered everything. 

 

10 hours ago, J.T. said:

I saw Starship Invasions (1977) when I was nine years old.

I recently watched it again on YouTube and was astonished by how much I remembered.

I was also sad because movies with aliens and dogfighting UFOs seems a lot more awesome when you are nine years old. 

 

Same thing happened to me a couple months ago when I randomly watched Iceman (1984). I saw it when I was a kid and after about 20 minutes it dawned on me that I remembered everything. Literally everything; sets, scenes, plot points. Pretty strange, because I don't remember that movie leaving that big of impression on me, it was just some random movie I would have seen on cable when I was like 8 or something.

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14 hours ago, HumanChessgame said:

I thought the Mortal Engines trailer looked pretty decent but given all these reviews I'll wait to see it at a place other than the theater. Are the books its based on any good?

I went and saw it. It was fine but completely forgettable. 

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I feel comfortable saying that Anna and the Apocalypse is the best Christmas Zombie musical there's ever been,

Seriously though, it is quite good. Although at times it'll hit you like a pixar movie. 

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Finally got around to watching Straight Outta Compton. If they hadn't said that the guy playing Snoop Dogg was Snoop Dogg, I'd never have guessed that's who he was supposed to be. But the guy playing Tupac looked more like Tupac than the hologram did. Obviously Cube looked like Cube, and Dr Dre looked exactly like Dre, only if he'd been filmed in 16:9 and then played in 4:3. It's a bit of an unusual one because obviously a lot of us lived through that exact period of history, but at that time the gap between American culture and British culture was a lot wider than it is now. So I don't want to say they've Wolf of Wall Street'ed it and told the story they wish they could have lived, exaggerated their success and fame at their peak, because for all I know they really were that massive in America. But in the UK at that time, Public Enemy were the big rap group (Run DMC second biggest), and NWA were kind of known as that Rap group Axl Rose likes (or pretends to like so people think he's not really racist, or possibly likes because he really is racist and likes what the N stands for).

But yeah in the UK, they're more famous amongst young people now, thirty years later, than they were  back then when it was happening. Good film though. I was expecting a few more party scenes of them shagging groupies and that, but Cube and Dre were producing so they weren't going to include loads of bits of them cheating on their wives. I mean, they may well never have cheated on their wives, I dunno, but famous musicians on tour kind of have a reputation no matter what genre they're in.

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They were kinda right on edge between "underground cool" and "mainstream success" to the best of my recollection.

It wasn't until Deep Cover and Good Day that the L.A. gangsta scene REALLY exploded coast to coast.

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1 hour ago, Brian Fowler said:

They were kinda right on edge between "underground cool" and "mainstream success" to the best of my recollection.

It wasn't until Deep Cover and Good Day that the L.A. gangsta scene REALLY exploded coast to coast.

When SoundScan came in 1991, it destroyed the myth that gangsta rap was not popular. Efil4zaggin was No. 2 on the Billboard charts without a video, radio play, or tour the first week of its release and then was #1 the second week. So they were pretty popular but there is only so much fame you can accrue when you get no radio play and you're not on MTV like that. 

I think 2 Live Crew would fit more along the lines of sitting on the fringes of mainstream success in the exact same timeframe of 88-91, just on the opposite coast. I don't think 9 out of 10 white people could name a 2 Live Crew song in 1990 and they had went gold on the first album in 86 and double platinum with As Nasty as They Wanna Be. They were more famous for causing a shitstorm in South Florida and Luke getting sued by Lucasfilm for using the name Luke Skyywalker.

Based on the quality of the content, 2 Live Crew is what white people thought was NWA. Hell, I can probably venture a guess that would apply to a lot of black people in middle America who didn't live in like Houston where that underground rap scene was burgeoning. Everytime I watch the the Radio Free Hillman episode of A Different World from 1989, IMO it just seems like gangsta rap gets thrown under the bus pretty hard and the way it's depicted is gimmicky (I'm assuming Dapper D is a stand in for Ice T because I doubt Cosby, Debbie Allen, or Susan Fales Hill really knew who Too Short or Schoolly D was in 88/89.). That episode predates C. Delores Tucker and Calvin O. Butts by about four or five years.

 

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As a white kid from rural Michigan, I knew Pop that Pussy in either 89 or 90, so I'll grant they were definitely bubbling over.

NWA got a lot more news coverage than actual airplay from what I can remember. But I turned 9 in late 90, so I'm going by memory of being a kid. And a kid in a town that you could get two rock stations, a pop station, a couple Christian music stations and about half a dozen country stations. And they didn't run cable down my road until 94.

But I definitely knew who NWA were in general terms, but I'm not sure I knew any of the songs until after The Chronic and It's On (Dr. Dre) 187um Killa really introduced me to the style. But my older sister had As Nasty (my mom was very lax about what we were allowed to listen to)

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52 minutes ago, Brian Fowler said:

As a white kid from rural Michigan, I knew Pop that Pussy in either 89 or 90, so I'll grant they were definitely bubbling over.

NWA got a lot more news coverage than actual airplay from what I can remember. But I turned 9 in late 90, so I'm going by memory of being a kid. And a kid in a town that you could get two rock stations, a pop station, a couple Christian music stations and about half a dozen country stations. And they didn't run cable down my road until 94.

But I definitely knew who NWA were in general terms, but I'm not sure I knew any of the songs until after The Chronic and It's On (Dr. Dre) 187um Killa really introduced me to the style. But my older sister had As Nasty (my mom was very lax about what we were allowed to listen to)

"Pop That" was 1991 and even then didn't really catch until 92 (right around the time Luke basically lifted Doo Doo Brown from 2 Hyped Brothers & A Dog w/ "I Wanna Rock"). By that point, 2 Live Crew as an entity was starting to play out unless you lived in the Miami Dade/Broward County area. 

As a black person who lived in Mississippi, I think Raise the Roof helped 2 Live Crew's music stay alive more than turn Luke into a bonafide solo artist. By the mid 90s, there were artists in Atlanta, Houston, Chicago, and New Orleans doing that particular subgenre more creatively and better than the hot garbage 2 Live Crew produced outside a handful of songs. The group Luke produced, Poison Clan, was doing 2 Live Crew better than 2 Live Crew (it actually helps to have good rappers in the group).

I think if Luke didn't fight the good fight against censorship, 2 Live Crew would be a Cold Crush Brothers type footnote in hip-hop/rap history.

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Fair enough. It's all jumbled together memories from before I was a teenager.

Anyway, my basic point is NWA was definitely pretty popular if not massively by the end of the 80's.

(I had totally forgotten about Banned in the USA until reading that post. Christ my sister played that so many fucking times) 

Otherwise, my only other memories of Luke is the various disses Dre threw at him. (Although I will forever maintain that the gap teeth/dick joke is more of a self own)

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52 minutes ago, Brian Fowler said:

Fair enough. It's all jumbled together memories from before I was a teenager.

Anyway, my basic point is NWA was definitely pretty popular if not massively by the end of the 80's.

(I had totally forgotten about Banned in the USA until reading that post. Christ my sister played that so many fucking times) 

Otherwise, my only other memories of Luke is the various disses Dre threw at him. (Although I will forever maintain that the gap teeth/dick joke is more of a self own)

Before I really start going back through the history of hip-hop/rap, most of my Luke memories are XXX related post 2 Live Crew. Also speaking of NWA, DJ Yella directing and producing black gonzo hardcore pornography in the late 90s and early 2000s is another strange part of rap lore. Snoop even had a hand in the adult industry (double entendre not intended) at that time.

What's crazy is post BET Uncut in an era where you have some of the lowest common denominator mumble rap, no one would be chilling in a porno movie like it was fashionable. Cardi B was dancing asshole naked like two years ago in a NYC strip club (to be fair, if she didn't get that spot on Love and Hip Hop, she would likely be in porn right now) and now part of pop culture canon in a way where she can do primetime commercials for major corporations and be an SNL music guest.

My point being that rap missed an exit and ended up in a strange, bizarre land some time ago.

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I don't know when I first head anything by N.W.A. but I do know that in the fall of 1990 I had a friend make me a copy of his Eazy-Duz-It Cassette after I listened to it on the school bus.  I saw the video for Pop That Pussy/Coochie a lot on the Jukebox Channel when I was in Jr. High, so 1991 or 1992.  I know I paid my $3.99 once to play it, 187 Proof by Spice 1, and I think Three Little Pigs by Green Jelly.  The last one might have been I'm an Asshole by Denis Leary, I know all of those got a lot of play and I thought it was pretty cool to see since we didn't have cable and MTV to watch any music videos.

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22 hours ago, Ace said:

I feel comfortable saying that Anna and the Apocalypse is the best Christmas Zombie musical there's ever been,

Seriously though, it is quite good. Although at times it'll hit you like a pixar movie. 

I really enjoyed this one but found myself wishing there were more songs. Highly recommend checking it out though.

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On 12/20/2018 at 7:05 PM, HumanChessgame said:

I thought the Mortal Engines trailer looked pretty decent but given all these reviews I'll wait to see it at a place other than the theater. Are the books its based on any good?

Books are pretty good actually. Read them to make sure they were ok for the kid years ago. I liked Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld better though.

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