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MMMMM-Good!!! The Food Thread Returns

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All the talk in the wrestling thread of fairground food had me wondering... do the fairs there try to outdo themselves each year with wacky, disgusting concoctions like the Stampede does here?

Here's a bunch of the new stuff being served at the moment - https://www.calgarystampede.com/stampede/attractions/food/midway-food

Again, that's just the new stuff. I presume the 30 dishes from last year are still available, and the year before and so on. I only go to the Stampede every 3-4 years but have never even been tempted to try any of this nonsense (generally I try to eat healthily anyway, so admittedly not my thing)

Edited by Swiftian

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24 minutes ago, Swiftian said:

All the talk in the wrestling thread of fairground food had me wondering... do the fairs there try to outdo themselves each year with wacky, disgusting concoctions like the Stampede does here?

Here's a bunch of the new stuff being served at the moment - https://www.calgarystampede.com/stampede/attractions/food/midway-food

Again, that's just the new stuff. I presume the 30 dishes from last year are still available, and the year before and so on. I only go to the Stampede every 3-4 years but have never even been tempted to try any of this nonsense (generally I try to eat healthily anyway, so admittedly not my thing)

Sign me up for The Mediterranean, that shit sounds good.

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1 hour ago, Swiftian said:

All the talk in the wrestling thread of fairground food had me wondering... do the fairs there try to outdo themselves each year with wacky, disgusting concoctions like the Stampede does here?

Here's a bunch of the new stuff being served at the moment - https://www.calgarystampede.com/stampede/attractions/food/midway-food

Again, that's just the new stuff. I presume the 30 dishes from last year are still available, and the year before and so on. I only go to the Stampede every 3-4 years but have never even been tempted to try any of this nonsense (generally I try to eat healthily anyway, so admittedly not my thing)

Yes they do.  Here are the new items this year at the Indiana State Fair:

https://www.indystar.com/story/entertainment/dining/2019/06/26/indiana-state-fair-food-new-foods-drinks-2019/1568833001/

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14 hours ago, Swiftian said:

All the talk in the wrestling thread of fairground food had me wondering... do the fairs there try to outdo themselves each year with wacky, disgusting concoctions like the Stampede does here?

Here's a bunch of the new stuff being served at the moment - https://www.calgarystampede.com/stampede/attractions/food/midway-food

Again, that's just the new stuff. I presume the 30 dishes from last year are still available, and the year before and so on. I only go to the Stampede every 3-4 years but have never even been tempted to try any of this nonsense (generally I try to eat healthily anyway, so admittedly not my thing)

A friend of mine went there.  When he showed us the menu we were salivating and looking for ways to re-create all that.  He put photos of it all on his Facebook and after a tad bit of scrolling you'll find them.  https://www.facebook.com/lens.man.3  But he had a blast and considering how skinny he is I'm always envious of how he has craptons of food yet doesn't gain an ounce.

Edited by NikoBaltimore

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Any suggestions recipe wise for lamb ribs?

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24 minutes ago, Eivion said:

Any suggestions recipe wise for lamb ribs?

You can never go wrong with lamb and cumin.  I've never cooked lamb ribs, but I've grilled plenty of lamb and love the combination of smoke, lamb and cumin.  I'd advise to buy whole seeds, and crack them instead of grinding them into a powder.  You can use a mortar and pestle or just crush them with the bottom of a pot.  

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1 hour ago, supremebve said:

You can never go wrong with lamb and cumin.  I've never cooked lamb ribs, but I've grilled plenty of lamb and love the combination of smoke, lamb and cumin.  I'd advise to buy whole seeds, and crack them instead of grinding them into a powder.  You can use a mortar and pestle or just crush them with the bottom of a pot.  

Blasphemy! Ya done left out the garlic!!!!  I'm just pinch-hitting for our resident Greeks (Nice Guy Eddie & Niko) who should be along sooner or later to school us on how to do it properly.

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Wish I could tell ya how to do it but I just like eating it. That and I'm a pretty bad cook but thankfully my parents are pretty darn amazing at it. But I can say garlic is a must for lamb. 

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20 minutes ago, OSJ said:

Blasphemy! Ya done left out the garlic!!!!  I'm just pinch-hitting for our resident Greeks (Nice Guy Eddie & Niko) who should be along sooner or later to school us on how to do it properly.

OK, I was about to leave work so I didn't want to go into a deep dive on how to cook lamb ribs, but here we go.  I'd personally create a paste of olive oil, salt, pepper, lemon zest, garlic and the aforementioned cumin seeds.  I'd slather it on the ribs, wrap them tight, and throw them in the fridge over night.  The next day I'd smoke them.  Start a small fire, around 275 degrees or so (you do have a grill thermometer don't you?) and cook them for about an hour or two.  After a couple hours, wrap them in foil...or better yet, butcher paper, and cook another hour or two.  You don't want to cook lamb for too much longer than an hour or two uncovered, you know that gamey flavor that lamb can get, that is from oxidation, meaning the longer it is exposed to air the more of those off flavors you can get.  So wrap them after a couple of hours.  You'll get the smokiness you are looking for, but none of the rank gaminess that you don't want.  To finish them, I wouldn't do a barbecue sauce, I'd do more of a chimichurri style sauce.  Since it's lamb I'd lean more on oregano, mint, and/or rosemary, but most herbs go great with lamb.  So, get a handful of parsley, oregano, mint, and/or rosemary a few cloves of garlic, a chile of some sort, and mince the bejesus out of them.  Add some lemon zest, some salt and pepper and enough red wine vinegar to create a lose paste (it should be just wet enough that every thing is covered in vinegar, but not so wet that it's soupy).  When I eat anything with chimichurri, I like to do a kind of 3 to 1 ratio with bites without sauce to bites with sauce.  So you get the smoky, fatty lamb, and then an acidic, herby, slightly spicy bite to cut through the fattiness.  Like I said, I've never cooked lamb ribs, but if you were to drop some off at my house, this is how I'd cook them.

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11 minutes ago, supremebve said:

Like I said, I've never cooked lamb ribs, but if you were to drop some off at my house, this is how I'd cook them.

After reading that I wish somebody would drop that off at my house. Holy crapola that sounds delicious. 

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1 hour ago, OSJ said:

Blasphemy! Ya done left out the garlic!!!!  I'm just pinch-hitting for our resident Greeks (Nice Guy Eddie & Niko) who should be along sooner or later to school us on how to do it properly.

 

1 hour ago, NikoBaltimore said:

Wish I could tell ya how to do it but I just like eating it. That and I'm a pretty bad cook but thankfully my parents are pretty darn amazing at it. But I can say garlic is a must for lamb. 

Garlic is something I never worry about since its a favorite of my big brother. He tends to season the foods regardless of which of us is cooking.

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On 7/23/2019 at 6:51 PM, NikoBaltimore said:

After reading that I wish somebody would drop that off at my house. Holy crapola that sounds delicious. 

Supremebve needs to have his own cooking show, dude knows his shit. Better yet, use my house as a test kitchen, Kathy and I can both cook well but we wouldn't mind a break and like I said, the dude knows his shit.

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This is more of just a random bitch... Mike Campbell can probably second me on this, although he's in the cattle-country part of the state. I'm in the part where sheep outnumber people by about 1000 to one. That being the case, why is it impossible to find mutton or lamb at the grocery store? Oh, if I want a whole butchered sheep, that's easily arranged, but I don't want a whole sheep, I just want enough for one, perhaps two dinners.  Driving from here to my sister-in-law's place on the rez you can't throw a rock without hitting a sign offering a whole sheep, butchered while you wait. WTF? How is it none of this meat finds its way into Safeway or (God forbid, that place I refuse to set foot in that starts with W-A-L)? This makes no more sense to me than the fact that all we get here is Atlantic salmon. Now I wasn't a geography major, and I'm well aware that we're not exactly close to the ocean, but I'm pretty damn certain we're a lot closer to the Pacific than we are to the Atlantic. I'm also reasonably sure that transportation of fish from AK/WA/OR/CA to NM is a damn sight cheaper than freezing the shit and trucking it across the country... 

 

End of rant.

(Yes, there was no mutton at any of the grocery stores and I wanted some today.)

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I can definitley second you on that OSJ. About a month or so ago, my partner at work and I were on patrol as we call is (aka just driving around) and we pass by one of my favorite restaraunts, so I ask if he's ever been there. He tells me he hasn't and then asks me if I've ever been to a place called "The Adobe Rose" which I haven't. I tell him that and he tells me that it's the only place that he knows of where someone can get lamb chops.

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On 7/27/2019 at 10:05 AM, Mike Campbell said:

I can definitley second you on that OSJ. About a month or so ago, my partner at work and I were on patrol as we call is (aka just driving around) and we pass by one of my favorite restaraunts, so I ask if he's ever been there. He tells me he hasn't and then asks me if I've ever been to a place called "The Adobe Rose" which I haven't. I tell him that and he tells me that it's the only place that he knows of where someone can get lamb chops.

Sister-in=law Lynn just brought us four to-go orders of lamb ribs from the Casino, soooo good!  And served with a huge roast green chili which I shall have for breakfast!

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Green Chili season is upon us! The family went shopping yesterday and the roasting was going on, which made the parking lot smell like heaven. I instantly grabbed a pack of muffins, which were still warm. I already decided that I'm getting the pie next time! 

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1 hour ago, Mike Campbell said:

Green Chili season is upon us! The family went shopping yesterday and the roasting was going on, which made the parking lot smell like heaven. I instantly grabbed a pack of muffins, which were still warm. I already decided that I'm getting the pie next time! 

I deboned the leftover ribs and stuffed the giant green chili with the lamb meat. It was absurdly good for breakfast for some fry bread*. Now the green chili cornbread is in the oven since we had a temperature drop it's actually okay t turn the oven on. The last few days which were in the nineties, not so much.

Sister-in-law Lynn makes the best fry bread I've ever had, I don't know what the difference is, Kathy follows the same steps and her fry bread is okay, but Lynn's is out of this world good. I am getting inspired to make a big pot of my famous chili...

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What is fry bread?

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On 8/3/2019 at 6:45 PM, Eivion said:

What is fry bread?

Sorry, didn't see your query. A typical frybread recipe consists of flour, water, salt, a small amount of oil, and baking powder. The ingredients are mixed and worked into a simple dough, and covered with a cloth for 30 minutes to an hour, until the dough rises. It is then formed into small balls, and are either rolled or pulled into flat discs prior to frying in hot oil. Many variations of this basic recipe exist, including substituting mayonnaise for oil in the dough (which produces a crisp, crunchy texture that resists getting soggy - ideal for Navajo tacos), and leavening the dough with a small container of yogurt or soured milk instead of using baking powder or yeast (produces a rich, sourdough flavor but requires several hours to fully leaven after the dough is prepared). Most frybread recipes do not use yeast at all because it was not typically available to Native peoples when this foodstuff was developed. In many Native American households, frybread dough is mixed early in the morning and left in a large bowl covered with a cloth to leaven and is used throughout the day to prepare fresh bread when needed.

Now obviously the next question will be: "What is a Navajo Taco?" One that uses frybread instead of a tortilla for the shell. 

Edited by OSJ
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As mentioned in another thread, I'm hitting the middle-aged portion of life and trying to learn to eat better. What are some recommendations for stuff in that vein? Mostly working on getting more veggies in the diet.

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Pittsburgh is one of the test cities for the new KFC donut & fried chicken sandwich. I was down for the weekend so I had to try it. A KFC breast between 2 in house made glazed donuts. It was pretty great...wouldn't have one very often, but something one should try if the like the mix of sweet & savoury.

Edit: I should've just added this when I first posted, my review of the sandwich 

 

Edited by Infinit
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Okay, as the temperature dipped down to three degrees last night, it is time to contemplate the making of a big pot of chili what to warm one from the inside out.  As I went to my recipe folder I was shocked to see that in some episode of virus-cleaning, the entire folder had disappeared, so I'll have to start from scratch and what better way to do so than with the fixins for a hearty bowl of red. Do note, proper chili does not contain beans, the very thought of which makes the baby Jeebus have a tantrum. Here's just what you need to get through a frost-filled weekend:

You will need:

4 strips of bacon

1 ½ lbs. of stew meat

¼ pork sausage

¼ ground beef

2 cans stewed tomatoes*

2 cans tomato sauce (6 oz)

2 cans tomato paste (6 oz)

1 large sweet onion*

 (*Vidalia or Walla Walla Sweet preferred)

16 oz. water, (it will cook off over time)

4-6 jalapenos, remove seeds but not the membranes (that’s where you get the heat)

2-3 habaneros (again, remove the seeds but not the membranes.) Should you be fortunate enough to live in an area that stocks ghost chilis, so much the better, 2-3 dried ghost chilis will work just fine in lieu of the habaneros.

Slice and dice your stew meat into tiny, tiny pieces. While you are doing this, slow fry the bacon until it is nice and crispy. Pat with paper towels to remove excess grease and grind up as fine as you can. Now slow cook your stew meat with the ground up bacon and pork sausage added. Your pork sausage is for texture and flavor, if you have some Jimmy Dean Hot Sausage handy that’s great. If not, see what’s handy at the grocery as an equivalent. Gradually add the diced onion and let simmer on low, low heat for an hour or so stirring frequently. Watch some rasslin while this is going on, no reason to try and rush things.  This is a good time to re-watch the Flair/Steamboat trilogy or something similar.

Add your tomato sauce/paste, stirring constantly. Again, allow to simmer on really low heat for a couple of hours or so. Excellent time to re-visit Flair/Race or Tiger Mask (Misawa) vs. Jumbo. Perhaps a Tanahashi marathon might be just the thing.

Now’s a good time to add in your spices. Here’s what you’re going to need:

Chili Powder

Garlic Powder

Cayenne Pepper

Black Pepper

Salt

And here’s the surprise ingredient! One half of a plain chocolate Hershey bar. No, I am not kidding, the addition of same gives a really subtle flavor profile and a tiny bit of sweetness.

What do you do with the other half of the chocolate bar? Well, I would imagine saving it for dessert would be a step in the right direction.

You may well wonder why I’m using dried spices instead of fresh ingredients (except for the peppers). Simple, you know exactly what you’re going to get flavor-wise with dried spices. As far as the peppers go, let personal taste be your guide. Main thing to remember is that you want to take your time with this, if you have a crock pot, you can let the meat, tomato sauce/paste & spices go for six-seven hours if you have the patience. The longer that you let it cook, the better. Check periodically and skim any grease that has floated to the top. If you followed directions and bought good quality stew meat, the grease should be pretty minimal. If you tried to save some coin by purchasing cheap-ass stew meat, you have no one to blame but yourself for the operation to become labor-intensive skimming off grease.

Add water as needed in VERY small quantities, you can always add more as needed, and allowing the liquid to slowly cook off is essential in melding the flavors together. Ideally, if you can let the chili slow cook overnight, you’re golden. Getting up every two three hours to stir and add water sounds like a pain-in-the-ass, but your efforts will be rewarded by the end product.  

Again, if you have a crock pot you can let this all simmer for 8-12 hours, adding water and allowing it to cook off as needed. Do note that I haven’t specified quantities on any of your spices, that’s for a reason; what I consider a perfectly reasonable level of heat might burn the roof of your mouth into one big blister. Conversely, what is hot for me might be considered mild in some parts. It’s all about getting that perfect blend of heat and flavor. Just hot for the sake of being hot is a waste, just as spices that are so subtle that they are completely overpowered by the heat are also a waste. What you want is to be able to discern the spices in each spoonful.

Do note that I’ve used beef stew meat and pork sausage as these should be readily available at any substantial grocery chain. Should you be fortunate enough to have more exotic or game meat available, ‘tis all good. Should you have bison, venison or the like available, you are in luck, as good as the beef/pork sausage version is, if you have the availability of bison, venison or the like, you have upped the deliciousness factor to the nth degree. Enjoy!

Edited by OSJ

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So burger joints...

In September I drove from Manchester, NH to Anaheim, CA and back for work, and I made it a point consume many burgers I wouldn't otherwise find in New England. It was awesome and terrible, and round 2 is coming up in a few weeks. So, where do I go? 

I should probably mentioned what I tried last time...

* Culver's was the absolute best, double butter burger with bacon fuck yes. I think I actually tried it a different trip, been to the Midwest a lot as well as down to AL and TN recently. Definitely a go to every trip since they don't exist up here.

* Of course I had In-N-Out, tasty but man people make it sound like a religious experience. Probably gonna go again this time because I have no idea when I'll be out that far again.

* Whataburger was good but I was far from blown away.

* Hardee's fucken rocked.

* Steak & Shake was solid but the fries are a bummer.

* We have Five Guys here but it tasted better on the company dime, still pretty damn good though! Same with Red Robin.

* Wings and a burger at Quaker Steak & Lube? Heavenly.

 

Stuff I haven't tried but am curious about: Shake Shack, Rally's, Krystal, Freddy's, BurgerFi, Hopdoddy. Anything else I should definitely check out?

 

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Posted (edited)

You go through Vegas? You should try Fuku Burger. Not life changing or anything but just as good as most of the ones you mentioned and has a cool atmosphere. And probably about half the hotels have a gourmet burger now place so there's that.

Edited by Execproducer
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I've got a couple hour connection in ATL in a couple weeks and I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations for food spots in the airport. I was thinking Shake Shack because I haven't had that in forever but I'd love more options!

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