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9 minutes ago, Eoae said:

So what you're saying is that Hillbilly Jim and the family got over because they reminded Vince of growing up in North Carolina?

Plowboy Frazier aka Uncle Elmer and the rest were all over the first few SNMEs. Then they just weren't featured at all.

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What was the deal with Mero leaving WCW for WWF rather apruptly in 1996? Talked himself out of a job? Care to elaborate, as I don't think I've ever heard the details on this one, if there are any worth mentioning?

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6 minutes ago, Shartnado said:

What was the deal with Mero leaving WCW for WWF rather apruptly in 1996? Talked himself out of a job? Care to elaborate, as I don't think I've ever heard the details on this one, if there are any worth mentioning?

Mero and Bischoff were supposedly at an airport and talking over his contract. Long story short, Mero told Bischoff he thought the WWF could make him a bigger star. Bischoff wanted him to come to the next TV and do a job on the way out (to DDP IIRC). Mero said he would only do it if Eric gave a new contract or something along those lines guaranteeing him a certain amount of money. Bischoff said no. Mero said he hopes he was leaving on good terms. Eric said he definitely wasn't leaving on good terms. There you go.

Bischoff buried him six feet deep on one Nitro post Mero showing up in WWF as Wildman Marc Mero. 

Edited by Elsalvajeloco
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22 hours ago, Elsalvajeloco said:

Yeah, Raven accidently almost murdered one of em in a tag match with Kanyon. 

I didn't actually see the Tony Pena match, but I did see the Ray Mendoza Jr. one. That one was hilarious because Schiavone and Larry tried to bill him as a newcomer. This 45 year old looking guy with gig marks on his chin...a newcomer to the sport. Not only is he a newcomer, but he stole Villano IV's trunks and boots.

Raven actually broke character to make sure VIllano was ok. He held Villano stable until the EMTs got into the ring. IIRC, their timing was off on a powerbomb/neckbreaker combo. Raven talked about it on one of his podcasts and he's remorseful about it to this day. He says he felt like shit b/c the whole thing was his fault. He rode to the hospital with Villano.

 

https://www.pwpodcasts.com/2017/08/27/written-podcast-recap-raven-effect-reflection-raven-causing-ring-injury-ralphus-puts-goldberg-place-van-hammer-puts-prayer-ric-flair-human-eight-ball-plu/

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People have long speculated that the long line of "scufflin Hillbillies" is Vinces aversion to his upbringing. Also supposedly Vince loved the Johnny B. Badd gimmick and really wanted to bring him in. 

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13 minutes ago, zendragon said:

Also supposedly Vince loved the Johnny B. Badd gimmick and really wanted to bring him in. 

There was no way in hell WCW (specifically Bischoff) was gonna let him be Johnny B. Badd in WWF. There were at each others throats about every little thing even by March/April 1996. 

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26 minutes ago, Elsalvajeloco said:

There was no way in hell WCW (specifically Bischoff) was gonna let him be Johnny B. Badd in WWF. There were at each others throats about every little thing even by March/April 1996. 

I think it was Cornette who said that Vince really wanted the Johnny B. Badd gimmick but never thought it through that he (Mero) couldn't bring the gimmick with him. That's why the Wildman thing wasn't that well fleshed out. They signed him and then just slapped that gimmick on him and thought they'd figure it out later.

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And Bischoff has been very complimentary about Mero in his podcast so I guess time has healed those wounds. Mero pretty much opened up every WCW ppv from 93-96 and Bischoff has praised him for being able to get the crowd going for the ppv and always looking like a million bucks.

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1 minute ago, cwoy2j said:

And Bischoff has been very complimentary about Mero in his podcast so I guess time has healed those wounds. Mero pretty much opened up every WCW ppv from 93-96 and Bischoff has praised him for being able to get the crowd going for the ppv and always looking like a million bucks.

He (Eric) was great friends with Mero even going over his house to watch big boxing matches. It was when Mero told him that Vince could make him a bigger star that the relationship got blown up.

Same thing with Paul Wight, and you could argue Bischoff was right in both cases even though Show has a job there for life.

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I was a fan of him as the Wildman, I had just started watching wrestling when he left WCW. In fact one of my earliest memories was watching what had to be one of his last appearances on a syndicated show. When he came to WWF I didn't realize he was Badd. Even looking back, he had a dynamic move set especially for 96 WWF and not being small. Years later guys in WWE just buried him as a wrestler after he got some news press because of the Benoit news coverage. Hunter especially when out his way to bury him as a worker which I thought was ironic to me because I thought Hunters best matches under the Greenwich Snob persona was against Mero. He also had great matches against Austin and Owen too early on. When he came back as Marvelous Marc, I hated it especially at first because I was a kid and I didn't understand why he came back as a boxer and that because of his knee it limited his move set.

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1 minute ago, Ziggy said:

I was a fan of him as the Wildman, I had just started watching wrestling when he left WCW. In fact one of my earliest memories was watching what had to be one of his last appearances on a syndicated show. When he came to WWF I didn't realize he was Badd. Even looking back, he had a dynamic move set especially for 96 WWF and not being small. Years later guys in WWE just buried him as a wrestler after he got some news press because of the Benoit news coverage. Hunter especially when out his way to bury him as a worker which I thought was ironic to me because I thought Hunters best matches under the Greenwich Snob persona was against Mero. He also had great matches against Austin and Owen too early on. When he came back as Marvelous Marc, I hated it especially at first because I was a kid and I didn't understand why he came back as a boxer and that because of his knee it limited his move set.

We had this discussion about Mero (I believe in the What If) thread. He was doomed a lot by timing.

1. When he came in, the company he just left was pre WCW cruiserweights back when it more Four Horsemen, Dungeon of Doom vs. Hogan and friends, etc oriented. Meanwhile, it's not like the WWF roster was killing it. So timing was great to him in that sense.

However, that wouldn't last five or six months. Once the AAA guys were in along with Eddie, Malenko, and Benoit who already had jumped from ECW to WCW in 95, the workrate level in major North American professional wrestling went up 150%. Regal and Finlay were already there (they had that crazy stiff match at Uncensored 96). That's just the WCW side. WCW in the spring 1996 doesn't even seem like it's in the same decade let alone the same year as the tail end of 1996. Hell, last night I watched the Nitro where Sting does the infamous "Stick It" promo from 9/16/96 in Asheville, NC. On the show, you have Juvi vs. Rey and also Konnan vs. Super Calo for the Mexican National HW title. Rey and Juvi have the match you expect. Konnan and Calo go out there and spam big moves like it's there last match they ever will have. Calo does this INSANE tope atomico on Konnan to the outside. THEN he no sells crashing to the floor, goes back, and hits a insane looking missile dropkick to the outside from even higher in the air. Juxtapose that with it taking Mero a whole five minutes to get his balance on the top rope so he can hit a Shooting Star Press, and it's no contest. Those guys had no reservations about killing themselves. Unfortunately (as I discussed when we originally had the conversation about Mero), he never figured out how to do the tope con hilo safely because his leg would fold underneath him in a totally unnatural angle 6 or 7 out of 10 times. Sometimes, he would hit it and land on his feet. Then, other times, you would think for sure he blew out his knee. You knew it was going to happen eventually.

2. In that same discussion, I brought up the fact he needed a mouthpiece. I'll add on to that because going back to timing, they were so focused on making something out of Austin, Hunter, and Ahmed as well by late in 96. In November, they would have Rocky Maivia. That's four guys right there they felt comfortable building their company around. They knew they were probably in a rebuilding stage, but they had faith they had the pieces to rebuild. Mero had the same issue they would run in to with Ahmed in the fact that they both couldn't talk and get themselves over in terms of promo ability in a company where talking was essential (it would get even more essential later on as the decade ended). Even though unlike Ahmed, he was a much safer worker, he still had some old WCW stench on him where there was no higher gear he could find. Like you pointed out, he was innovative. However, he was innovative for all of four or five months before that shit was the norm for the entire industry in North America. The reason why Shawn Michaels could be the best young (or youngish since he in his late 20s by the time he became WWF world champ) worker head and shoulders above a lot of people is he didn't have much competition from 92-96. However, what put him over the top was undeniable charisma and presence ALONG WITH his working ability and look. You could make that guy a star even if he had a match that was nothing to write home about. I think they saw in Austin that he could pull off the same thing. Same with Hunter because once he got out of the dog house, they got the IC belt off Mero and put it on Hunter w/ the Mr. Perfect heel turn/swerve. He was off to the races from there. When Dwayne got there, they had already plans to push him to the moon. How was Marc Mero going to compete with that as just a good worker? Goldust was a good hand, but he never got pushed above a certain level. Add the fact Undertaker was always going to be around. You can't four or five #1 guys. It doesn't work like that.

If you think about it, Mero, Rhodes, and Austin were all at the same level (TV/US title) for several years in WCW. However, when Austin has a chance to work with Mero at a house show in Los Angeles when both are now in WWF, he turns it down. Now I dunno why he turned it down explicitly, but I can only venture a guess that Austin knew he was now above working the same guys he had just worked in WCW not too long before. I don't think it was a slight to Mero as much as "I came to WWF to work against Shawn, Bret, Undertaker, and all the big name guys on the loop". Austin is the same guy who got into it with Grizzly Smith because he didn't want to job to Erik Watts when he was out here having great matches with Ricky Steamboat and others on house shows. Austin was smart enough to know the perception guys got back then working with guys on a lower level. If one guy is seen as a jobber, the thought was you must be a jobber too. It's probably unfair in many cases since everyone isn't Steve Austin, but he at least had the balls to go against whatever he saw as death to his character. Moreover, Austin went in there with Savio who was on a lower level but could make him a better worker. Thus, their program in Austin's eyes was justified. Austin came in and immediately sought out ways to elevate himself. He even had it out with McMahon about what his character should and should not do early on.

I think Mero, going back to his argument with Bischoff, thought Vince was going to have this Midas touch and make him into something much bigger. That's why in the original discussion we had here, I was adamant about Mero having a Sunny or someone who could talk for him. Yeah, Sunny probably would somewhat overshadowed him. However, it's not as crippling as having his wife there who is hot but cannot really talk or doesn't have the innate sense of how to get Mero over as a big act. So Rena/Sable was there as eye candy, but unhelpful eye candy. If it were me, I move away from the silly racially ambiguous Tarzan gimmick and pivot to making him Taz meets Bruiser Brody meets Sabu that only Sunny or whomever manages him can control. The Wildman we saw was fine in the New Generation era. Just like Hunter's blueblood gimmick though, it had too many limitations to work as they transitioned to the Attitude era. That's why they did the boxer gimmick with Mero. They knew that Wildman gimmick was now dated.

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3 hours ago, zendragon said:

People have long speculated that the long line of "scufflin Hillbillies" is Vinces aversion to his upbringing. Also supposedly Vince loved the Johnny B. Badd gimmick and really wanted to bring him in. 

I don't get that because you look at how Hillbilly Jim was brought in, Vince was going to make him a MAJOR star.  He was literally one of the first LJN figures, and he was on the Rock 'n Wrestling cartoon.  He lasted three months before he got injured and he barely ever wrestled again.  The only legit angle he took bumps with was the Manager of the Year Award, and he only did tags or six-mans on TV thereafter.  The only singles matches he had were usually on Prime Time, and they were short.  Ironically, he's the only WWF guy I know who is undefeated against Andre the Giant. (Studd quit and Jim replaced him and took the countout or DQ wins.)

I take it more that Uncle Elmer SUCKED, Cousin Junior quit randomly, and Cousin Luke was arguably worse.

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2 hours ago, Elsalvajeloco said:

We had this discussion about Mero (I believe in the What If) thread. He was doomed a lot by timing.

1. When he came in, the company he just left was pre WCW cruiserweights back when it more Four Horsemen, Dungeon of Doom vs. Hogan and friends, etc oriented. Meanwhile, it's not like the WWF roster was killing it. So timing was great to him in that sense.

However, that wouldn't last five or six months. Once the AAA guys were in along with Eddie, Malenko, and Benoit who already had jumped from ECW to WCW in 95, the workrate level in major North American professional wrestling went up 150%. Regal and Finlay were already there (they had that crazy stiff match at Uncensored 96). That's just the WCW side. WCW in the spring 1996 doesn't even seem like it's in the same decade let alone the same year as the tail end of 1996. Hell, last night I watched the Nitro where Sting does the infamous "Stick It" promo from 9/16/96 in Asheville, NC. On the show, you have Juvi vs. Rey and also Konnan vs. Super Calo for the Mexican National HW title. Rey and Juvi have the match you expect. Konnan and Calo go out there and spam big moves like it's there last match they ever will have. Calo does this INSANE tope atomico on Konnan to the outside. THEN he no sells crashing to the floor, goes back, and hits a insane looking missile dropkick to the outside from even higher in the air. Juxtapose that with it taking Mero a whole five minutes to get his balance on the top rope so he can hit a Shooting Star Press, and it's no contest. Those guys had no reservations about killing themselves. Unfortunately (as I discussed when we originally had the conversation about Mero), he never figured out how to do the tope con hilo safely because his leg would fold underneath him in a totally unnatural angle 6 or 7 out of 10 times. Sometimes, he would hit it and land on his feet. Then, other times, you would think for sure he blew out his knee. You knew it was going to happen eventually.

2. In that same discussion, I brought up the fact he needed a mouthpiece. I'll add on to that because going back to timing, they were so focused on making something out of Austin, Hunter, and Ahmed as well by late in 96. In November, they would have Rocky Maivia. That's four guys right there they felt comfortable building their company around. They knew they were probably in a rebuilding stage, but they had faith they had the pieces to rebuild. Mero had the same issue they would run in to with Ahmed in the fact that they both couldn't talk and get themselves over in terms of promo ability in a company where talking was essential (it would get even more essential later on as the decade ended). Even though unlike Ahmed, he was a much safer worker, he still had some old WCW stench on him where there was no higher gear he could find. Like you pointed out, he was innovative. However, he was innovative for all of four or five months before that shit was the norm for the entire industry in North America. The reason why Shawn Michaels could be the best young (or youngish since he in his late 20s by the time he became WWF world champ) worker head and shoulders above a lot of people is he didn't have much competition from 92-96. However, what put him over the top was undeniable charisma and presence ALONG WITH his working ability and look. You could make that guy a star even if he had a match that was nothing to write home about. I think they saw in Austin that he could pull off the same thing. Same with Hunter because once he got out of the dog house, they got the IC belt off Mero and put it on Hunter w/ the Mr. Perfect heel turn/swerve. He was off to the races from there. When Dwayne got there, they had already plans to push him to the moon. How was Marc Mero going to compete with that as just a good worker? Goldust was a good hand, but he never got pushed above a certain level. Add the fact Undertaker was always going to be around. You can't four or five #1 guys. It doesn't work like that.

If you think about it, Mero, Rhodes, and Austin were all at the same level (TV/US title) for several years in WCW. However, when Austin has a chance to work with Mero at a house show in Los Angeles when both are now in WWF, he turns it down. Now I dunno why he turned it down explicitly, but I can only venture a guess that Austin knew he was now above working the same guys he had just worked in WCW not too long before. I don't think it was a slight to Mero as much as "I came to WWF to work against Shawn, Bret, Undertaker, and all the big name guys on the loop". Austin is the same guy who got into it with Grizzly Smith because he didn't want to job to Erik Watts when he was out here having great matches with Ricky Steamboat and others on house shows. Austin was smart enough to know the perception guys got back then working with guys on a lower level. If one guy is seen as a jobber, the thought was you must be a jobber too. It's probably unfair in many cases since everyone isn't Steve Austin, but he at least had the balls to go against whatever he saw as death to his character. Moreover, Austin went in there with Savio who was on a lower level but could make him a better worker. Thus, their program in Austin's eyes was justified. Austin came in and immediately sought out ways to elevate himself. He even had it out with McMahon about what his character should and should not do early on.

I think Mero, going back to his argument with Bischoff, thought Vince was going to have this Midas touch and make him into something much bigger. That's why in the original discussion we had here, I was adamant about Mero having a Sunny or someone who could talk for him. Yeah, Sunny probably would somewhat overshadowed him. However, it's not as crippling as having his wife there who is hot but cannot really talk or doesn't have the innate sense of how to get Mero over as a big act. So Rena/Sable was there as eye candy, but unhelpful eye candy. If it were me, I move away from the silly racially ambiguous Tarzan gimmick and pivot to making him Taz meets Bruiser Brody meets Sabu that only Sunny or whomever manages him can control. The Wildman we saw was fine in the New Generation era. Just like Hunter's blueblood gimmick though, it had too many limitations to work as they transitioned to the Attitude era. That's why they did the boxer gimmick with Mero. They knew that Wildman gimmick was now dated.

Mero came in with a lot of momentum. He was instantly programmed into the Intercontinental Title and was having fun feuds with HHH. I still think his SSP is the best out of them all. What stopped him was getting injured and forcing the gimmick change. 

If Mero didn't get hurt after winning the IC title he would have been a much bigger deal in the Attitude era.

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7 hours ago, Elsalvajeloco said:

Plowboy Frazier aka Uncle Elmer and the rest were all over the first few SNMEs. Then they just weren't featured at all.

Until he remembered and came up with the Godwinns. And then he forgot again and someone showed him Deliverance finally and he decided to green light the Wyatts. It's like every decade he wakes up one day after a bad dream he can't quite remember about his childhood and says "HILLBILLIES!"

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17 minutes ago, Wyld Samurai said:

Mero came in with a lot of momentum. He was instantly programmed into the Intercontinental Title and was having fun feuds with HHH. I still think his SSP is the best out of them all. What stopped him was getting injured and forcing the gimmick change. 

If Mero didn't get hurt after winning the IC title he would have been a much bigger deal in the Attitude era.

Sure Mero came in with momentum, but if you look at where the promotion was at the time when he came in, Mero just being a competent worker gave him momentum. For as much shit WM XI got, twelve isn't much better. We've seen with the Iron Man match, at best it's YMMV. However, if you look at the latter half of the year, it was apparent he was going to get passed or lapped eventually. The injury just sped it up. They had plans for Hunter. They had plans for Austin. They had plans for Ahmed. You had Mick Foley being a great surprise and a boon for WWF. Undertaker really did an amazing job putting him over. If early 1996 was a lot of nothing happening (I mean Piper and Warrior returning shows they were desperate as hell) besides Hall and then Nash leaving, then early 1997 was going to be crowded as hell in terms of activity. It was gonna be tough for Mero to seperate himself from the field. Hunter was able attach himself to Michaels. I think they already knew Austin and Rocky had something. Mankind would start the Three Faces of Foley. Unfortunately for Ahmed, he basically alienated himself and his position eventually was no more. Without something to get him over the top, it was gonna be tough for Mero because the expectations were going to grow. When Dustin came in as Goldust in late 95, they spent so much time on building that character and allowed him to end up in a few main events and notable programs. However, by late 96/early 97, he was just a pretty good utility guy to get other talent to the next level. So it was easy for momentum to just sorta peter out. This goes especially if they have higher priority talents.

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3 hours ago, Elsalvajeloco said:

If you think about it, Mero, Rhodes, and Austin were all at the same level (TV/US title) for several years in WCW. However, when Austin has a chance to work with Mero at a house show in Los Angeles when both are now in WWF, he turns it down. Now I dunno why he turned it down explicitly, but I can only venture a guess that Austin knew he was now above working the same guys he had just worked in WCW not too long before. 

As I remember it told, Austin was mad that his upcoming opponent was dumb enough to let himself be powerbombed by Sable. No one would take Mero seriously as a contender.

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Just now, The Great ML said:

As I remember it told, Austin was mad that his upcoming opponent was dumb enough to let himself be powerbombed by Sable. No one would take Mero seriously as a contender.

That was later when Austin had already taken off. There was a story (maybe the Curtain Call ep of Grillin JR via Conrad reading something from the Observer) where Austin turned down working with Mero when both had just came in.

Found the 411 piece on it:

Quote

On Austin not wanting to work with Mero: “The only time I ever heard anybody — Stone Cold told me one time, we booked him with Vince’s assistance with Marc Mero in LA. And that didn’t go over well. And Steve didn’t even know who he was working with until he got to the building. And then he got to the building and he’s working with Mero. Jack Lanza called me, one of the agents. He said, ‘Our boy Stone Cold is pissed, JR.’ I said, ‘How come?’ ‘Well he didn’t want to work with Mero tonight.” Okay. And what else? ‘Well, we had had him going on in the middle of the card so he could get on the road early to do TV.’ And I said, ‘Yeah?’ And he said, ‘He don’t like that either.’ I said, ‘He don’t like anything today, does he?'”

On talking with Austin about it: “I said, ‘Okay, gimme a second.’ So I rebooked the card, got Austin another opponent. He didn’t work with Mero, and he went on last. So I see him at TV and I said, ‘Look. Vince wanted you to work with Mero. That wasn’t my original idea, I’m not just passing the buck, if I was I’d tell you.’ So he didn’t want to do that. He said, the thing that stuck out to me was, ‘I worked my whole god-damned life to be able to close the show at a WWF event. And we’re in the second-biggest market in the nation. And you guys want me to go on in the middle of the card. I’m gonna close the show, period.’ So I said, ‘Sounds good to me! Just trying to help you out here.’ And there was no big argument, that was his contention.”

On Vince’s reaction to it: “But in all the years I was there, other than Scott [Hall] and Dustin [Rhodes], and Steve and Marc Mero, there was no issues in that respect. So it was kind of unusual. And Vince didn’t take well to that stuff. I know when he got the agent report about Steve and Mero, he said, ‘What the hell happened to Mero and Austin?’ I said, ‘Well, Austin didn’t wanna work with him.’ So it was pretty simple.”

 

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Imagine the set of nuts on this guy to be there for a handful of months and be like, "No, I'm main eventing these cards."

No one deserves to be compared to this guy.

Edited by Elsalvajeloco
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ESL brings up several excellent points, so thank you for those, once more. It got me thinking if there have been similar instances where someone is pretty much THE innovating, ahead of the curve worker one minute, and all of a sudden the competition becomes so stiff that he/she is no big deal anymore? I think Brian Pillman and Scott Steiner kinda went through this even before the injuries took their toll on them, but they were later able to compensate with explosive personalities and mathematical prowess!

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I'm probably in the minority, but I actually remember liking the Marvelous Marc Mero heel run.  I thought he was a good mid-card heel and it made sense he would become jealous of Sable, storyline-wise.  Hats off to him for selling those Sable powerbombs.

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This probably belongs in the What If thread, but what the hell?

I'm wondering what would have happened if Scott Steiner didn't shit the bed vs. Flair at the Dixie Dynamite Clash. I don't know why Scott had animosity towards Ric for sandbagging when it's clear Ric was trying his hardest to call the best match possible. However, Scott was just like a deer in headlights. Ric would take a bump on the outside, and he's clearly motioning toward Scott to come get him and he just stands there. Scott was so awesome during hot tags and getting his spots in, but in a high profile match against Ric Flair, he didn't know how to stretch those spots into a real main event match. There is also an hilarious moment where Scott has to take a bump over the top rope, but he gets caught on the top rope because he's this massive human being. So he has to jump using his feet on the mat and take himself over the ropes. Then when the announcer (I believe Gary Michael Cappetta) does the time calls, he wrestles with no urgency at all. NONE. Like he doesn't hear him. It's just an all time embarrassing performance from someone who could be otherworldly when he was on.

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7 minutes ago, _MJ_ said:

I'm probably in the minority, but I actually remember liking the Marvelous Marc Mero heel run.  I thought it was a good mid-card heel and it made sense he would become jealous of Sable, storyline-wise.  Hats off to him for selling those Sable powerbombs.

Oh, I liked him too. Once his push was all but dead he was able to start doing the SSP again, too ( called it Marvelocity, if I rememer correctly). He beat Droz with it at one PPV in '98. Hell, I've liked every Mero incarnation since about late '92 when Badd started showing signs of improvement in the ring!

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2 hours ago, Elsalvajeloco said:

one of the agents. He said, ‘Our boy Stone Cold is pissed, JR.’ I said, ‘How come?’ ‘Well he didn’t want to work with Mero tonight.” Okay. And what else? ‘Well, we had had him going on in the middle of the card so he could get on the road early to do TV.’ And I said, ‘Yeah?’ And he said, ‘He don’t like that either.’ I said, ‘He don’t like anything today, does he?'”

On talking with Austin about it: “I said, ‘Okay, gimme a second.’ So I rebooked the card, got Austin another opponent. He didn’t work with Mero, and he went on last. So I see him at TV and I said, ‘Look. Vince wanted you to work with Mero. That wasn’t my original idea, I’m not just passing the buck, if I was I’d tell you.’ So he didn’t want to do that. He said, the thing that stuck out to me was, ‘I worked my whole god-damned life to be able to close the show at a WWF event. And we’re in the second-biggest market in the nation. And you guys want me to go on in the middle of the card. I’m gonna close the show, period.’ So I said, ‘Sounds good to me! Just trying to help you out here.’ And there was no big argument, that was his contention.”

On Vince’s reaction to it: “But in all the years I was there, other than Scott [Hall] and Dustin [Rhodes], and Steve and Marc Mero, there was no issues in that respect. So it was kind of unusual. And Vince didn’t take well to that stuff. I know when he got the agent report about Steve and Mero, he said, ‘What the hell happened to Mero and Austin?’ I said, ‘Well, Austin didn’t wanna work

What was the Scott Hall/Dustin Rhodes thing?

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For some weird reason I haven't watched that particular Clash, or if I have, I've slept through it. I need to watch this right now, so I can see what it's all about.

WTF, this Clash starts with Sting& Luger vs Doom and I haven't watch this? Thank you for reminding me, accidentally.

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Sting & Luger vs Doom?!?
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