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[OCT 2016] MOVIE DISCUSSION

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I was looking at TCM's schedule and was deeply amuses that the Frankenstein marathon (Frank, Bride, Son) is immediately followed by The Wizard of Oz

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Xavi wanted to go to the movies today, so we checked what was on, watched the trailers for Magnificent Seven and Deepwater Horizon, and he said Deepwater looked better, so we went to see that. Loved the early exposition scene, showing how sealing the pipes is supposed to work properly. And when they were doing the 'hero goes to work as if it's just a normal day' scene, rather than him getting in his car and then cutting to him getting out at the heliport, they stop at a gas station to fuel up. To make a point about something. The build up to the disaster, showing how many corners were being cut and how in need of a total refit the boat was even before... nightmarish. And then when the actual blow happens, and the inevitable explosion and inferno... it's a miracle the number of casualties was so low. It didn't look like any human should have been able to live through that, let alone 90% of the people on there. But as the movie makes clear, they never should have been in anything like that much danger.

It's good. very good. But most of the movie is in the trailer.

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On ‎10‎/‎1‎/‎2016 at 6:26 PM, AxB said:

It's good. very good. But most of the movie is in the trailer.

Most of the movie was on the evening news for almost a year.  The movie looks slick and well produced but I think I can pass on it for now.

Yeah, I will spend money to go see Birth Of A Nation to support Nate Parker's directorial effort.  I am going to be angry with white people for at least a week. 

Some of the white people I know at work that want to see this movie also say that they are going to be angry with white people for at least a week.

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I watched Tombstone again. I've lost count now. But... damn, it's such a great movie. Val Kilmer is amazing.

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Mrs. Drew and I saw Magnificent Seven. We loved it. It didn't break any new ground, but it was entertaining as shit. Chris Pratt is charming as hell, and Denzel is still a monster on screen. Just a giant. I also REALLY enjoyed Vincent D'Onofrio's performance. The original might be my favorite movie of all time, and I was not sure how a remake would go, but it was clear the director loved the source materials, so what we got was an homage to so many great flicks from yesteryear. Be on the lookout for sets from other recent Westerns...

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I only watched Nate Parker's segment on 60 Minutes last night and am now angry at white people for at least a week. Beyond my general misanthropy, that is.

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45 minutes ago, just drew said:

Mrs. Drew and I saw Magnificent Seven. We loved it. It didn't break any new ground, but it was entertaining as shit. Chris Pratt is charming as hell, and Denzel is still a monster on screen. Just a giant. I also REALLY enjoyed Vincent D'Onofrio's performance. The original might be my favorite movie of all time, and I was not sure how a remake would go, but it was clear the director loved the source materials, so what we got was an homage to so many great flicks from yesteryear. Be on the lookout for sets from other recent Westerns...

Took the family last night and we loved it as well. Second on D'Onofrio, he won that movie. Main complaint is that the middle section dragged a bit, but also left a lot of the backstories pretty spare. We end up learning a lot about Denzel and Ethan Hawkes' characters, but only bits and pieces of the other 5. I would have loved to learn more about Red Harvest, beyond "the elders said I am different, I'm with you guys now." Counter to that, I love that we don't really learn too much about Pratt's character, especially his motivations for joining. There's really nothing shown that would make you think such a character would willingly walk into such a selfless, suicidal mission, so you have to imagine it yourself.

Very enjoyable and definitely fills the popcorn Western niche that's been pretty under served for last 30+ years. The last one I can think of is something like The Quick and the Dead, which fell more under camp, than action romp. I guess this is what The Lone Ranger wanted to be, but fuck that movie.

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Saw Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children today. Nothing at all spectacular or likely to be well remembered, but quite fun and enjoyable.

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Jackie Brown is one boring movie.

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4 hours ago, Roman said:

Jackie Brown is one boring movie.

Where's that ignore button?

 

(But seriously, one of my top ten of all-time and I'm legitimately baffled by that opinion)

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10 hours ago, Roman said:

Jackie Brown is one boring movie.

This is the response you are going to get to that opinion here. 

"You know what we got here? Mothafuckin Charlie Bronson! Mr. Majestyk..."

And you can't get us on Drexl losing because Jackie Brown IS Mr. Majestyk

 

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Do tell me what I've missed. I'm not being sarcastic either. I genuinely want to know what I missed. I'd read so many glowing reviews and praise for Jackie Brown, but at not one point did it grab me. Of course, I also dislike Breaking Bad and thought The Wire was boring, and Seinfeld is the un-funniest shit in history, so I don't at all preclude the possibility I'm just an imbecile with no taste.

I've yet to watch True Romance. I was planning on doing that tonight. I don't know what it's about, but the actors in it are some of my favourites, so...

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EDIT: wrong thread!

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I watched the first season of The Wire a few years back. Correctly guessed nearly every plot beat half way through the season, hated the lead character and basically felt like it was the most overrated thing I've ever seen.

 

Still I tried to persist and started season 2. About halfway through that first episode I finally said "fuck this"

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Don't really know what to say... don't watch True Romance? I've really got nothing for you or Fowler here. I also find Seinfeld more irritating than funny but the rest is just weird to me.

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True Romance is a favorite of mine.  I've seen Jackie Brown a few times and remember basically nothing about it as it just didn't strike a chord with me either way.  Then again I'm not a big fan of Tarintino's cinematic fan fiction in general.

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On 08/10/2016 at 1:13 PM, Roman said:

I've yet to watch True Romance. I was planning on doing that tonight. I don't know what it's about, but the actors in it are some of my favourites, so...

I hope you're not a racist Sicilian. Because if you are, you'll really hate the best scene in True Romance.

I'm with you on Seinfeld though. That's awful. I had thought it was just an American thing, or maybe even a Northeastern American thing, but Throughsilver loved it too, and he was English like I am.

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Oh lord, I just turned on Vengeance of Fu Manchu (with Chris Lee) and it has the most unconvincing fake fight this side of a Rudy Ray Moore film. I mean just piss your pants funny bad. And Sir Lee speaking in his proper British accent while playing Fu Manchu is just about as hilarious.

Wait, this came out in 1968?! How high were they? 

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Birth of a Nation was pretty good.  Yes. I am very angry at white people today.

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18 hours ago, Curt McGirt said:

The Ebert.com review gave it only two stars and was actually pretty scathing. http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/the-birth-of-a-nation-2016

Hey, Shin Godzilla got 3 1/2! http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/shin-godzilla-2016

Oh and Under the Shadow got the full four snowflakes and was completely raved about

I can't wait until Under The Shadow is out on DVD.  It will be the companion piece to A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night.

I saw the awesome reviews for Shin Godzilla.  My reserve tickets are burning a hole in my pocket.

I didn't feel that Birth of a Nation was entirely horrible, but it is rather exploitative in not so good ways.  If you're looking for a movie with true historical teachable moments about the darkest chapter in American history, this ain't the one.  This is a movie designed to provoke, not caution.

You can tell that Nate Parker is very passionate about Nat Turner's story, but there is a lot of modern meta going on that takes away from the already horrible politics of the period.

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16 minutes ago, J.T. said:

I didn't feel that Birth of a Nation was entirely horrible, but it is rather exploitative in not so good ways.  If you're looking for a movie with true historical teachable moments about the darkest chapter in American history, this ain't the one.  This is a movie designed to provoke, not caution.

This is the point that the folks who don't like it on my Facebook timeline are upset about.

I, of course, always wonder why people think a movie of Fiction is going to be a historical documentary

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I posted this in the end of the Sept thread - but here are the 85 official submission for Best Foreign Film for the Academy Awards

Spoiler

The 2016 submissions are:

Albania, “Chromium,” Bujar Alimani, director;

Algeria, “The Well,” Lotfi Bouchouchi, director;

Argentina, “The Distinguished Citizen,” Mariano Cohn, Gastón Duprat, directors;

Australia, “Tanna,” Bentley Dean, Martin Butler, directors;

Austria, “Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe,” Maria Schrader, director;

Bangladesh, “The Unnamed,” Tauquir Ahmed, director;

Belgium, “The Ardennes,” Robin Pront, director;

Bolivia, “Sealed Cargo,” Julia Vargas Weise, director;

Bosnia and Herzegovina, “Death in Sarajevo,” Danis Tanovic, director;

Brazil, “Little Secret,” David Schurmann, director;

Bulgaria, “Losers,” Ivaylo Hristov, director;

Cambodia, “Before the Fall,” Ian White, director;

Canada, “It’s Only the End of the World,” Xavier Dolan, director;

Chile, “Neruda,” Pablo Larraín, director;

China, “Xuan Zang,” Huo Jianqi, director;

Colombia, “Alias Maria,” José Luis Rugeles, director;

Costa Rica, “About Us,” Hernán Jiménez, director;

Croatia, “On the Other Side,” Zrinko Ogresta, director;

Cuba, “The Companion,” Pavel Giroud, director;

Czech Republic, “Lost in Munich,” Petr Zelenka, director;

Denmark, “Land of Mine,” Martin Zandvliet, director;

Dominican Republic, “Sugar Fields,” Fernando Báez, director;

Ecuador, “Such Is Life in the Tropics,” Sebastián Cordero, director;

Egypt, “Clash,” Mohamed Diab, director;

Estonia, “Mother,” Kadri Kõusaar, director;

Finland, “The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki,” Juho Kuosmanen, director;

France, “Elle,” Paul Verhoeven, director;

Georgia, “House of Others,” Rusudan Glurjidze, director;

Germany, “Toni Erdmann,” Maren Ade, director;

Greece, “Chevalier,” Athina Rachel Tsangari, director;

Hong Kong, “Port of Call,” Philip Yung, director;

Hungary, “Kills on Wheels,” Attila Till, director;

Iceland, “Sparrows,” Rúnar Rúnarsson, director;

India, “Interrogation,” Vetri Maaran, director;

Indonesia, “Letters from Prague,” Angga Dwimas Sasongko, director;

Iran, “The Salesman,” Asghar Farhadi, director;

Iraq, “El Clásico,” Halkawt Mustafa, director;

Israel, “Sand Storm,” Elite Zexer, director;

Italy, “Fire at Sea,” Gianfranco Rosi, director;

Japan, “Nagasaki: Memories of My Son,” Yoji Yamada, director;

Jordan, “3000 Nights,” Mai Masri, director;

Kazakhstan, “Amanat,” Satybaldy Narymbetov, director;

Kosovo, “Home Sweet Home,” Faton Bajraktari, director;

Kyrgyzstan, “A Father’s Will,” Bakyt Mukul, Dastan Zhapar Uulu, directors;

Latvia, “Dawn,” Laila Pakalnina, director;

Lebanon, “Very Big Shot,” Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya, director;

Lithuania, “Seneca’s Day,” Kristijonas Vildziunas, director;

Luxembourg, “Voices from Chernobyl,” Pol Cruchten, director;

Macedonia, “The Liberation of Skopje,” Rade Šerbedžija, Danilo Šerbedžija, directors;

Malaysia, “Beautiful Pain,” Tunku Mona Riza, director;

Mexico, “Desierto,” Jonás Cuarón, director;

Montenegro, “The Black Pin,” Ivan Marinović, director;

Morocco, “A Mile in My Shoes,” Said Khallaf, director;

Nepal, “The Black Hen,” Min Bahadur Bham, director;

Netherlands, “Tonio,” Paula van der Oest, director;

New Zealand, “A Flickering Truth,” Pietra Brettkelly, director;

Norway, “The King’s Choice,” Erik Poppe, director;

Pakistan, “Mah-e-Mir,” Anjum Shahzad, director;

Palestine, “The Idol,” Hany Abu-Assad, director;

Panama, “Salsipuedes,” Ricardo Aguilar Navarro, Manolito Rodríguez, directors;

Peru, “Videophilia (and Other Viral Syndromes),” Juan Daniel F. Molero, director;

Philippines, “Ma’ Rosa,” Brillante Ma Mendoza, director;

Poland, “Afterimage,” Andrzej Wajda, director;

Portugal, “Letters from War,” Ivo M. Ferreira, director;

Romania, “Sieranevada,” Cristi Puiu, director;

Russia, “Paradise,” Andrei Konchalovsky, director;

Saudi Arabia, “Barakah Meets Barakah,” Mahmoud Sabbagh, director;

Serbia, “Train Driver’s Diary,” Milos Radovic, director;

Singapore, “Apprentice,” Boo Junfeng, director;

Slovakia, “Eva Nová,” Marko Skop, director;

Slovenia, “Houston, We Have a Problem!” Žiga Virc, director;

South Africa, “Call Me Thief,” Daryne Joshua, director;

South Korea, “The Age of Shadows,” Kim Jee-woon, director;

Spain, “Julieta,” Pedro Almodóvar, director;

Sweden, “A Man Called Ove,” Hannes Holm, director;

Switzerland, “My Life as a Zucchini,” Claude Barras, director;

Taiwan, “Hang in There, Kids!” Laha Mebow, director;

Thailand, “Karma,” Kanittha Kwunyoo, director;

Turkey, “Cold of Kalandar,” Mustafa Kara, director;

Ukraine, “Ukrainian Sheriffs,” Roman Bondarchuk, director;

United Kingdom, “Under the Shadow,” Babak Anvari, director;

Uruguay, “Breadcrumbs,” Manane Rodríguez, director;

Venezuela, “From Afar,” Lorenzo Vigas, director;

Vietnam, “Yellow Flowers on the Green Grass,” Victor Vu, director;

Yemen, “I Am Nojoom, Age 10 and Divorced,” Khadija Al-Salami, director.

 

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30 minutes ago, RIPPA said:

This is the point that the folks who don't like it on my Facebook timeline are upset about.

I, of course, always wonder why people think a movie of Fiction is going to be a historical documentary

The Nat Turner slave revolt actually happened, man.  Southhampton County, Virginia.

The area in Southhampton where a lot of the fighting took place is still named Hangem Road.

I didn't expect it to be a documentary, but BoaN could've still have managed to be insightful while also being inflammatory.  Historical fiction can still be historical while also being fictional.

Birth of a Nation really isn't designed to get people talking to one another about how to make things better; it's designed to get one side mad at the other and that tends to make things worse.  I am also an idiotic idealist that believes in the best of people.

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