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i am just starting a giant Spider-Man read. I started with Amazing Fantasy #15 and have read the first 10 or so issues of Amazing. I plan on reading everything (Amazing, Web of, Peter Parker, Spectacular, etc.) up until November of 1998 when it looks like the entire line went through a relaunch or something. Over 1000 books so it should take me a couple years, but i previously did the same with Batman and X-Men and really enjoyed the result. 

Most looking forward to the Clone Saga (reputation aside....) and i plan to read the Superior storyline after i finish my plan as it is.

@The NaturalAnything i should keep an eye out for, or things to keep in mind?

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4 hours ago, paintedbynumbers said:

The Mark Waid Captain America is pretty good actually. I am extremely partial to the Brubaker Captain series.  The whole run from Death of Captain America on is incredible and some of his best work. 

 

I also have been on a huge Daredevil kick and recommend Frank Miller's work even though some of it doesn't hold up as much as it should in 2020.  If you like a darker story I would go Brubaker and Bendis.  Waid's version is more laid back than the crime noir of Brubaker/Bendis. 

Thank you.

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5 hours ago, twiztor said:

i am just starting a giant Spider-Man read. I started with Amazing Fantasy #15 and have read the first 10 or so issues of Amazing. I plan on reading everything (Amazing, Web of, Peter Parker, Spectacular, etc.) up until November of 1998 when it looks like the entire line went through a relaunch or something. Over 1000 books so it should take me a couple years, but i previously did the same with Batman and X-Men and really enjoyed the result. 

Most looking forward to the Clone Saga (reputation aside....) and i plan to read the Superior storyline after i finish my plan as it is.

@The NaturalAnything i should keep an eye out for, or things to keep in mind?

Thanks for asking, @twiztor. I've ranked them chronological:

If This Be My Destiny. TASM #31-33.

How Green Was My Goblin/Spidey Saves The Day. TASM #39-40.

The Arms of Doctor Octopus!/Doctor Octopus Lives!/And Death Shall Come! TASM #88-90.

The Night Gwen Stacy Died. TASM #121-122.

The Kid Who Collects Spider-Man. TASM #248.

Kraven's Last Hunt. WOSM #31, TASM #293, PP: TSSM #131, WOSM #32, TASM #294 and PP: TSSM #132.

Venom. TASM #300.

Best of Enemies. TSSM #200.

The Gift. TASM #400.

The Morning After. TASM #400.

---

In order of quality, the top three are:

1. The Night Gwen Stacy Died. TASM #121-122.

2. How Green Was My Goblin/Spidey Saves The Day. TASM #39-40.

3. The Kid Who Collects Spider-Man. TASM #248.

---

Hope my post helps and enjoy. Look forward to your opinion on them like the Batman you've read.

Edited by The Natural
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I am doing something now similar to what Twiztor is doing and am reading Daredevil from the beginning.  Some of the old Stan Lee stuff is corny and dated but it's interesting to see him progress from yellow suit to the icon we have now. 

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Daredevil may be the longest running Marvel silver Age book with tjhe longest strecthes of average/mediocre books. Most folks would say theres almost nothing memorable until the Miller era and thats in the 150s. Iron Man might be close.

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The Amazing Spider-Man (Vol. 5) #50.LR written by Nick Spencer and Matthew Rosenberg, the artist is Federico Vicentini in Fallen Order. The story goes from Norman Osborn talking to Dr Ashley Kafka and Spider-Man battling the Order of the Web. It’s a good issue seeing a different Norman Osborn showing empathy and contrition for his past criminal history – hurting Peter Parker, Harry Osborn, his own son and killing Gwen Stacy. The issue gets bonus marks for the return of a character we haven’t seen in TASM for too long. I wasn’t sure whether to get these tie-in issues to the main story in the flagship title and I can’t stand Cindy Moon/Silk. I decided to get this and likely the others as I’ve read every Nick Spencer issue on TASM (Vol. 5) and I’m really enjoying it. Hope this side series of five TASM #50-54.LR issues is worth the money paid.

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13 hours ago, odessasteps said:

Daredevil may be the longest running Marvel silver Age book with tjhe longest strecthes of average/mediocre books. Most folks would say theres almost nothing memorable in the Miller era and thats in the 150s. Iron Man might be close.

Typo?  I'm guessing you meant "before the Miller era" which is probably true.  Not sure I'd agree there was nothing memorable in Miller's run.

Has Daredevil maybe been Marvel's mot consistent book since Miller?  I've never been a huge fan of the character, but there's been a lot of good writers on the book since Miller.  Nocenti had a long run with JRJR that I liked a lot, Kesel had a good run, Bendis was on the book for years and did mostly great work. Brubaker, Andy Diggle was on the book for a year, Waid, etc.  There hasn't been that many bad periods for the title in the past 20-30 years.  Most of the longer runs on the title have been "bigger name" writers who did great work. 

I may be wrong.  Daredevil's never been a personal favorite of mine, but it seems like Marvel's taken care of it rather well when assigning creative teams, unlike other books which seem to get "prestige" runs every few creative teams and filler in between.

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Yeah. I meant until Miller. You had the SF era when Denny wrote the book. But I don't recall anything memorable about that, other than the setting and the Widow being the co star. 

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The Sensational Spider-Man Annual #1 (May 2007). To Have and To Hold written by Matt Fraction and drawn by Salvador Larroca. The Civil War/Back in Black fallout continues as Peter Parker reveals publically he’s Spider-Man, he’s on the run from the law with Mary Jane Watson, his wife and Aunt May dying from a snipers bullet. This was a very welcome issue looking at the marriage of Peter Parker/Mary Jane Watson particularly MJ sticking by Peter putting a S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent she once knew in his place. I particularly liked the sequences around a mix tape of recordings/at the airport with the inner thoughts of M, then Peter and both of them. 2007 was a horrible year for Spider-Man with the Spider-Man 3 movie and the start of One More Day ending the marriage and into 2008’s Brand New Day. To Have and To Hold was the lone bright spot for Spidey fans that year. Ditto for the Spectacular Spider-Man animated series in 2008.

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1 hour ago, Eoae said:

Typo?  I'm guessing you meant "before the Miller era" which is probably true.  Not sure I'd agree there was nothing memorable in Miller's run.

Has Daredevil maybe been Marvel's mot consistent book since Miller?  I've never been a huge fan of the character, but there's been a lot of good writers on the book since Miller.  Nocenti had a long run with JRJR that I liked a lot, Kesel had a good run, Bendis was on the book for years and did mostly great work. Brubaker, Andy Diggle was on the book for a year, Waid, etc.  There hasn't been that many bad periods for the title in the past 20-30 years.  Most of the longer runs on the title have been "bigger name" writers who did great work. 

I may be wrong.  Daredevil's never been a personal favorite of mine, but it seems like Marvel's taken care of it rather well when assigning creative teams, unlike other books which seem to get "prestige" runs every few creative teams and filler in between.

Miller had some excellent stories and basically brought life to Daredevil.  Now you guys may be harsh on the older stories. Who can forget Stilt man and Purple Man?   Or the battle with Sub Mariner?  So many good early stories. Not Miller level sure but good none the less. 

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Chichester did Fall of the Kingpin, which wasn't awful but man, it was a slog to get to that point. 

Stan Lee did write "Brother Take My Hand" did he nor? That might have been tbe first great DD story

Miller took a 2nd string Spidey villain and made him something better than he would've been by leaving him as a Spidey nemesis. If not for Miller, Wilson Fisk would be using a taser tipped walking stick to steal museum artifacts

 

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Hey, it’s Deadpool!/Operation: That Wacky Doctor’s Game!/Stumped or…This Little Piggy Went…Hey! Where’s the Piggy?!/Why is it, to Save Me, I Must Kill You/The Doctor is Skinned!...Or, The End of Our First Story Arc. Deadpool (Vol. 1) (January-May 1997) written by Joe Kelly and drawn by Ed McGuinness. Deadpool’s first ongoing series sees Deadpool take up mercenary work with a church acting as a bar for mercs, Blind Al and Weasel as supporting characters to DP, DP thinks he’s a loser and meets his maker, Doctor Killbrew from Weapon X. I really enjoyed this minus a story strand going nowhere. Along the way Deadpool fights the Incredible Hulk and Taskmaster. The storyline I was most into were the mercenaries hanging out and taking contract hits and Wade after revenge on Doctor Killbrew. Wade Wilson; “In his presence, I have heard grown men cry to Gods they stopped believing in years ago. I screamed so loud I didn’t even recognize the sound of my own voice”. There’s a powerful page as DP tells Dr. Killbrew what to do or else as he leaves him alive. You can see the influence the story had on the first and best Deadpool movie (2016) and the lesser sequel, Deadpool 2 (2018).

With Great Power Comes Great Coincidence, Deadpool (Vol. 1) #11 (December 1997) written by Joe Kelly and penciller Pete Woods. Deadpool and Blind Al are sent back in time to The Amazing Spider-Man #47 (April 1967) written by Stan Lee and drawn by John Romita Sr. Deadpool and Blind Al need to work their way back without causing lasting consequences so Deadpool uses a hologram to disguise himself as Peter Parker. Blind Al doesn’t need the hologram projector as she already resembles Aunt May. This made for one of the most unique, funniest and best stories for Deadpool and Spider-Man. Panels from the original are used as is or are edited by Pete Woods. It’s a really funny issue with digs at Aunt May, Blind Al wants to waste Anna Watson despite Blind Al warning Deadpool about their actions affecting the timestream, DP can’t get over Harry Osborn/Norman Osborn’s hairstyles and the real Peter Parker’s reaction “It’s almost as if there was a clone in my place…but that’s just crazy talk!” I also cracked up at DP signing #”Wade! Wade! Wade of the Jungle! Strong as he can be--! Ahhhahh! Watch out for my knee!” to Kraven the Hunter. The cover is also a funny homage to the iconic Amazing Fantasy #15 cover. It’s an inventive story so that gets additional credit to it from me.

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On 10/25/2020 at 3:52 PM, twiztor said:

i am just starting a giant Spider-Man read. I started with Amazing Fantasy #15 and have read the first 10 or so issues of Amazing. I plan on reading everything (Amazing, Web of, Peter Parker, Spectacular, etc.) up until November of 1998 when it looks like the entire line went through a relaunch or something. Over 1000 books so it should take me a couple years, but i previously did the same with Batman and X-Men and really enjoyed the result. 

Most looking forward to the Clone Saga (reputation aside....) and i plan to read the Superior storyline after i finish my plan as it is.

@The NaturalAnything i should keep an eye out for, or things to keep in mind?

I'm actually doing the same thing, but I think I have stuff up to 2019. I posted a long time ago that I was doing an entire run of Batman, but it's grown to a ton of other books that I'm reading in chronological order. I'm currently on 1975 with a bit of a backtrack for Magnus: Robot Fighter, but it's interesting to see Marvel down size from certain books and the general shift in story telling and art from the 60s to the 70s.

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13 minutes ago, The Outsider said:

I'm actually doing the same thing, but I think I have stuff up to 2019. I posted a long time ago that I was doing an entire run of Batman, but it's grown to a ton of other books that I'm reading in chronological order. I'm currently on 1975 with a bit of a backtrack for Magnus: Robot Fighter, but it's interesting to see Marvel down size from certain books and the general shift in story telling and art from the 60s to the 70s.

Let us know if you want Batman and Spider-Man recommendations.

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I've said for years that the DD/Sub-Mariner issue is the single best comic Stan Lee ever wrote/was credited as writing, and I stand by that.

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4 minutes ago, Brian Fowler said:

I've said for years that the DD/Sub-Mariner issue is the single best comic Stan Lee ever wrote/was credited as writing, and I stand by that.

Haven't read that. Will have to having asked for Captain America story arc and Daredevil.  Please can I have some? Best Stan Lee written story for me is Amazing Fantasy #15, Spider-Man's first appearance drawn by Steve Ditko.

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reading Daredevil from the start now.  The Submariner issue is one of the first 10 issues of the series from 1965. Such a great read.   The Miller stuff basically saved the character from being cancelled,  once you get to Bendis and Brubaker it's more gritty, criminal noir.   Waid brings back more of a light hearted, colorful, Daredevil dare I say similar to a Peter Parker early Spiderman.

 

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3 hours ago, J.H. said:

Waid's DD is more akin to how Stan Lee envisioned the character imo

James

Oh, without question. DD was originally a swashbuckler. But he was also pretty much dead in the water when they gave Miller the writing job. It was only published only every other month, and they were willing to let a young penciller take over writing duties, because it was such an unimportant, low tier him that easily could've been canceled at any time.

What I do like about Waid's run is that he didn't just revert it back to the early incarnation with no acknowledgment of what had been going on for the previous 35 years. The whole "Matt is repressing his trauma, and it might blow up in his face at any time" is a really beautiful undercurrent to the book.

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Best of Enemies! The Spectacular Spider-Man #200 (May 1993). JM DeMatteis is the writer and Sal Buscema’s the artist. Harry Osborn/the Green Goblin’s feud with Peter Parker/Spider-Man comes to dramatic conclusion. This was a great story as the shadow of Norman Osborn, the original Green Goblin envelops the named characters, Mary Jane Watson and Gwen Stacy. I liked how Harry promised MJ that no matter what happens between the Green Goblin and Spider-Man, she’s safe and how he misses Gwenn. Harry also stalls Peter putting him on edge. JM DeMatteis is skilled in killing characters giving them the story to go out on and anniversary issues. For the former: Kraven the Hunter/Harry Osborn/Aunt May and the latter here and TASM #400. I’d certainly have kept Kraven and Harry dead. There’s an argument for Aunt May but I’d miss her in Joseph Michael Straczynski’s TASM run as he wrote a great Aunt May, probably the best, Only JMD and Brian Michael Bendis’s Aunt May in Ultimate Spider-Man offer competition. One more note, something seeing Mary Jane Watson smoking.

Edited by The Natural
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