odessasteps

Non-Big Two Comics Omnibus Thread

640 posts in this topic

Everything non Marvel and DC

Dark Horse, Image, Boom, Oni, Dynamite, Archie, Fantagraphics, Monkeybrain,...

Posted Image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just picked up the first two books of The Dirfting Classroom by Kazuo Umezu. I haven't read the whole series (borrowed a couple from a friend a long time ago) but from the bits and pieces of it I've read as well as Cat Eyed Boy I'm pretty confident saying that Umezu is the best horror comics artist of all time.Who else is in the running for that title?Charles BurnsRichard CorbenJunji ItoSteve DitkoWhat do you guys think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not my personal favorite, but people would probably say Kelley Jones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I liked Kelley Jones, when I was younger, but I've grown to love him.

What about Bernie Wrightson?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked Bernie Wrightson a lot when I was a teenager but I haven't read any of his stuff in years. I remember liking Captain Sternn more than his horror stuff though.I read Jones on Batman as a kid and he seemed like more of a superhero artist who was also drew creepy stuff than a horror artist. That said, I probably haven't read any of those comics since I was a child so I don't know how they hold up at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neo Quantum and Woody has gotten some borderline fawning reviews.  I am still pretty reluctant to buy a Q&W without Priest/Bright, even if they've given their blessings.  I've heard at least a couple reviewers praise the decision to streamline the characters' backstory by making Woody a foster-turned-adopted brother to Eric who eventually ran away, but to me that feels like it misses out on the idea of Woody being a rich pampered kid who lost everything when his mom self-destructed and he didn't have a way to go back to the life he'd left.  That was never the most important part of the character, but it was important enough that it feels wrong to drop it just to cut down on the explanations.

 

Has anybody read it?  Do the characters still feel like the same people?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was okay, but didn't have the same spark as the original.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be fair, very little does.  Priest in his late-90s peak is one of the best cape writers of all time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished reading Lucifer by Mike Carey, which is a spinoff of Gaiman's The Sandman.  If you dig The Sandman, you'll probably dig this series too.  I really enjoyed the way Lucifer was portrayed in Seasons of Mist(manipulative and arrogant but not dishonest or necessarily evil), and this portrayal is continued and elevated in Carey's Lucifer.  I won't go out on a limb and say it's better than The Sandman, but I do prefer Lucifer over Dream as a protagonist.

 

I'll probably read Christopher Ware's Jimmy Corrigan, The Smartest Kid on Earth next. 

 

I'm also thinking about getting into Brian Wood's books: Mara (mini-series) or DMZ .  I've heard good things about both.

 

I think I might cave and check out the first 5 issues of Saga.  I was going to wait until Brian K. Vaughn finished the thing, but they're only on what?  Issue 11 or 12?  Sigh.

 

Anyone read MIND MGMT by Matt Kindt? Yay or nay?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought it was okay, but stopped reading after issue 2.

I think the first tpb of saga is 1-6 with a "cliffhanger."

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think I might cave and check out the first 5 issues of Saga.  I was going to wait until Brian K. Vaughn finished the thing, but they're only on what?  Issue 11 or 12?  Sigh.

12. I believe they are taking breaks every six issues/months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The synopsis of MIND MGMT interests me.  Plus, I like to read "soon to be a major motion picture" graphic novels so I can be the cool, know-it-all kid in the group of friends I see it with upon its release.  I'll probably give it a read when it's further along in the series.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone else reading True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the FCBD and thought it was kind of neat, ended up listening to the album on my Spotify rock opera binge a few months back and was surprised at how much I enjoyed it, but I haven't gotten the regular mini yet; I tend to run a month behind on most digital singles to save money and I'm behind on even that.  Lovely art though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been reading it in digital. It's shaping up interestingly, though two issues in I'm still wondering how they're going to wrap the thing in six overall. Definitely feels like it could support an ongoing. More than anything, I'm really digging the development of Korse (something only hinted at in the music videos) and the idea of the Killjoys being rebel icons in the future and influencing the continued resistance. Despite the titular characters being dead throughout, their presence is very much felt in the series. I'm digging it a lot.Wouldn't mind an adaptation of the music videos, honestly, though I doubt they'd actually do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I read Killjoys #1, and I liked it even though not that much felt like it happened.  I'll second Dragon wanting to see the original story from the album/videos told, simply because it's so fragmented and sketchy.  I particularly liked the backmatter explaining some of the odd little details of the world, just wish there were more of it.

 

It still feels weird to be buying a comic based on a concept album by a band that did mostly harmonic pop-punk angst fests, but I absolutely can't deny Way has a way of crafting a world even if the characters feel more like ideas than people.  And Becky Cloonan draws pretty.  (And "Bulletproof Heart" is a pretty great song in its own right.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, they're doing a Robotech/Voltron crossover.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw that yesterday.  I am curious how they are going to integrate those two distinct anime licenses.  I am excited though

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Top Shelf has a Comixology sale on right now, and if you don't have $4 for 434 pages of awesomeness in the form of Infinite Kung Fu, I might not want to know you.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Top Shelf has a Comixology sale on right now, and if you don't have $4 for 434 pages of awesomeness in the form of Infinite Kung Fu, I might not want to know you.

AAARGH, I wish i read comics digitally.  Or had a tablet with E-reader capability.  I have yet to buy Infinite Kung Fu in the paperback form but it is beautiful and I love kung fu flicks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That and King City are like, $35 together with free shipping on Amazon. They're among the best indie graphic novels I've read, ever. Doooooooo it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm also thinking about getting into Brian Wood's books: Mara (mini-series) or DMZ .  I've heard good things about both.

 

I think I might cave and check out the first 5 issues of Saga.  I was going to wait until Brian K. Vaughn finished the thing, but they're only on what?  Issue 11 or 12?  Sigh.

 

DMZ is fine as long as you don't mind incredibly exaggerated satire which is such an extreme parody of its subject that it gets hard to swallow at times.  It's one of those books where the authors seem to be saying "this is what the real world is really like, man!" and my response is "...over on Earth 2 maybe, buuuuut, not here".  I read the first TPB of Saga and it's a hell of a lot of fun, a fantasy/scifi/horror/adventure/comedy mashup with a really unique voice and a strong sense of practical realism for such an out-there speculative bit of fiction.  ("Am I shitting? It feels like I'm shitting!")

 

Anyone else a fan of Chew?  Easily my favorite indy comic right now, one of the funniest funnybooks I've ever read.  It's got SUCH a deep playbook of GREAT running jokes that it almost rivals stuff like Arrested Development in that area.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chew Saga and Fatale are the indy books i still buy in print, largely for the print only extras.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been on the Chew bandwagon for awhile.  Admittedly, I'm not up to date on it because I'm waiting to read the whole thing through trades, but the first 15 issues were fun.  The art is full of easter eggs, and Layman seems to know where he wants to take the story so most arcs are well-plotted out.  I know it's won a couple of awards, but I hope gets more attention and maybe even a tv show (animated or live-action) in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad i didnt mention the big thing in issue 30, then. :)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now