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Matt Watches 1989 AJPW/1986 NJPW on a Treadmill


Matt D
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Ok it wasn't pretty but I gave it a go tonight. I need to get better at my emergency shut off string management. I have no idea how far I went because it kept shutting off and resetting. ANYWAY... I'm skipping the end of that Pogo tag, because it's bad luck. I don't believe I wrote that stupid thing up when I was bleeding all over the place. Let's move on.

7/11/86: Maeda/Kido vs Kimura/Takano: Another look at Takano as Takano. The first few minutes of this were probably the best I've seen Kimura look on that mat, primarily against Kido. Some really good work here. I usually think of him as more of a scrapper down the stretch. This was fairly back and forth with Kimura and Takano having slightly better teamwork, though at any point Maeda or Kido could just drag someone back into their corner. I don't have strong opinions about Takano yet. He went up big for Maeda on throws. That's for sure. He didn't always feel like he belonged in there but he did more than he didn't which is saying something. I wouldn't call any of this less than good. Match got super heated towards the end. They had been double teaming Maeda abut he reversed a whip and just took Takano's head off with his spin kick in the corner. I thought that was going to be the end of the match but he made it back up and survived some kicks to make the tag. From there Kimura and Maeda had the start of a good finishing exchange but Kimura popped back up after the spin kick again and hit the Inzuma Leg Lariat and I really hate when they do that. It's 1986! Don't do that shit. You're fifteen years too early! Assholes. Anyway, it ended up on the floor and Takano was bloody and chairs got involved and the DQ for tossing over the rail felt sort of justified. Good stuff.

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I'm pretty much 100% at this point but still easing back in.

7/11/86 Inoki/Fujinami vs Williams/Markoff: I think it's Markoff and not Smirnoff. That's what my file says. He doesn't do a ton, just a bunch (we're talking 4) big boots so it doesn't really matter. This is all about Steve Williams. They could have given him the Vader gimmick even. Man, he's such a hoss. He starts the match with Inoki by picking him up out of a headlock and tossing him across the ring. Nasty landing. It felt like business as usual. Ah, Inoki has locked on a headlock. But nope. He's going to get tossed around like a child by Doc. Then he just puts his head into his chest, lifts him up, and drives him to the top rope (Inoki tried to leap over him and arm drag him but it didn't quite work). He picks up guys and just crotches them on the ropes like it's nothing. He press slams Fujinami and Fujinami puts his arms out like an airplane for some reason but it's a great visual. Just a beast. He hits a crazy Stampede on Fujinami at one point. At one point, Inoki ends up on the floor and as Williams rolls back in, he accidentally dumps all the ribbons and streamers on Inoki and it's an awesome visual. I have no idea about this as a match but it was a hell of a spectacle. I'd pay to see Doc and Inoki wrestle one-on-one after these two encounters.

7/11/86: Sakaguchi/Koshinaka vs Pogo/Nagasaki: Yeah, I mean the team of Pogo and Kendo are actually pretty good. They cut off the ring. They have fairly nasty offense. Pogo does all sorts of weird outlandish kicks and stuff. Healthy amount of choking with ropes they find at ringside. They're just really credible. There was a lot of beating on Koshinaka here which is always enjoyable to watch. The crowd always loves the butt butt though it wasn't sold well here. It was a big moment when he hit it but then he went to the top and got nailed. I get the sense Nagasaki just didn't want to take whatever he was about to do. Likewise with the monkey flip attempt that followed. He just stopped and stomped on his face instead. He also had a really cool roll up to win it where he bent him over like the set up for Sydal's Lightning Spiral but just rolled him up out of it. I can't name one think Sakaguchi did in this one but I can assure you he was probably pretty good.

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7/18/86: Fujiwara/Maeda vs Pogo/Nagasaki: Look, let me put it this way: Andre sold more for Maeda than Nagasaki did. Now, ultimately, that made for a kind of cool match but not necessarily a good one. Nagasaki kicked out at 1 for the spin wheel kick. Maeda tried to take him down on a throw and Nagasaki just fell on him. He wasn't much better for Fujiwara, which meant that Fujiwara eventually had enough and just blatantly started to choke him. That worked. When it came time to head for the finish, Nagasaki gave, but until then, he really ate them up. Pile drivers and spike piledrivers on Maeda, jamming everything, that sort of thing. There was an awesome moment where Fujiwara caught Pogo's standing spin kick and made him pay. I don't know. When this turned on a dime and Fujiwara started blatantly choking and using the 4 count it got pretty great. Nagasaki and Pogo continue to come off as weirdly credible in an offbeat way.

7/18/86: Inoki/Fujinami vs Bad News Allen/Steve Williams: I keep misreading these matches as the singles Inoki vs Williams match (it's coming) and get excited, but it's just another tag. It's a good one though. I've seen a good chunk of 1980 era Bad News and certainly 1988 era Bad News but 86 is a bit new to me. He was very savvy and here both worked well and not well with Fujinami. They had a kind of high level of difficulty on some of their chain wrestling and rope running exchanges and only it smoothly 2/3rds of the time. It was probably worth the effort despite that though. He absolutely knew what he had in a partner with Doc and they did a bunch of tandem stuff which wasn't pretty but was impressive. I've seen a ton of 86 Doc and he was not wrestling this way in mid-south. He's such a beast here. His back drops are the first dangerous ones I've seen chronologically in Japan. He just manhandles Inoki. Inoki and Fujinami can stay in it with teamwork and kneedrops out of the corner and what not but it's hard when Bad News is jamming the side of a chair into your face or Williams is just walking around the ring with you pressed onto his head. Fun stuff.

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7/19/86: Fujinami/Kimura/Koshinaka vs Kido/Fujiwara/Maeda: Handheld. Fujiwara was an awesome bastard in this one, at one point goading Fujinami to come in and then immediately tagging out to Maeda. I've said it before but Kimura can hold his own on the mat by this point. He's not as definitive as Fujinami but he looks very credible in there, even if he's best when he's scrapping. Overall this was pretty chippy, a lot of caught kicks and very little just given. Good exchanges all around. Koshinaka was the weak link for his side. Kido just exudes competence. Maeda got a great throw on a caught kick where he almost turned it into a power slam like Benjamin. Nice finishing stretch where Kimura got the Inazuma leg lariat out of nowhere but Koshinaka couldn't capitalize and ate the nastiest spin wheel kick to the face.

7/19/86: Yamada vs Takada: Hey, this was really good! Also a handheld. The first ten minutes or so were just on the mat. Yamada had a great way of being spry and constantly trying to just toss his body into the ropes in order to get out of holds. They teased the Takada tombstone but Yamada actually got it first and he had some good nearfalls as things went on, but Takada was just too much for him. Takada helped him up after the fact. I'd 100% rather watch Yamada than Koshinaka or Cobra if given the choice by this point in 86. I assume we got this after the 80s set came out. I'll post these two for you guys since HHs don't get flagged as much.

 

 

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You need to switch to jogging outside while watching stuff on a tablet. That can't possibly go wrong!

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  • 3 weeks later...

7/25/86: Maeda/Fujiwara vs Williams/Bad News: Hey! This was boatloads of fun. 142 on the set? That's some BS right there. This is a solid 100. Or 85 or something. I really wonder what people didn't like about it. Bad News starts by trying to headbutt Fujiwara and milks it for a good two minutes with the turnbuckle shots. Then he goes for soft bits. Crowd is super excited for Maeda vs Doc. Doc is the unstoppable force and Maeda is the guy who is going to kick that force and catch him and suplex him using his own momentum. And Doc will just a pry a leg and take you down. I'm pretty certain Bad News had a great wrestling mind and he knew what he had in the ring at most times. Sometimes he might have been too stubborn to make the most of it maybe? But he knew. And he had some cool double teams with Doc. All of Fujiwara's headbutt comebacks are awesome. Bad News randomly using the chain to choke Fujiwara as Doc distracts the ref really worked. The finish, with Bad News dismantling the ring so that Doc could slam Fujiwara's spine into the turnbuckle on the inside and then subsequently over and over on the outside really worked but they should have given Doc a countout win on it instead of the double countout. Post match is chaotic with chairs flying. I don't know. This really worked for me. Just great characters all playing ball, each bringing something different, special, and unique to the table.

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7/25/86: Kimura/Fujinami (c) vs Pogo/Nagasaki: Look, I've watched a lot of Japanese tags from this era (and I think we can group 86 NJPW and 89-90 AJPW into an era even if there are differences, just for the sake of the argument). I understand that you have to meet this stuff where it is for the most part. But I am human, and as a human, and someone who has watched a lot of wrestling and a lot of tag wrestling, including a ton of 50s-70s French Catch tags and plenty of Rey Bucanero teaming with Ultimo Guerrero and Smackdown Six stuff and a ton of Houston and Portland late 70s-early early 80s 2/3 falls tags and modern tags where 2/3rds of the match is "everything breaking down" into a finishing stretch, and a lot of other wrestling to boot, and the most perfect form of pro wrestling, to me, is the southern tag. Shine, heat, comeback. Hope spots, cutoffs, a perfect hot tag, a face charging into the ring to get revenge, a hot finish. Sometimes, like in the AWA, you get double heat! Sometimes, like with the Guerreros (Chavo/Hector) you get stuttering heat. Sometimes you have a guy like Cornette or Heenan on the outside. Sometimes, you get an extra wrinkle, like an injury or a size differential or partners who don't get along.

And for some reason, which I think we've talked about quite a bit, they never, ever, ever do a satisfying Southern Tag in Japan in this era and it drives me absolutely nuts. I just wish I could shout back through the screen and through thirty-five years and tell them to do things just a little bit differently, just time that tag just a little bit differently, just bring the crowd up and down and up again and prime them for the moment, build it up and pay it off. They do so many things well. I care because they do so many things well and I know if they could just marry all of these awesome things that they do with this element of wrestling I love so much, it'd be over the top great. The one time that it actually works out that way, it is! (That's Kobashi/Kikuchi vs Can-Ams by the way).

And sometimes they get really, really close and then it just... plofffff. This was a case. Kimura has the ribs taped. Pogo and Nagasaki ambush them to start. They focus on the injury! They keep distracting the ref so he misses the tag! The heat builds! They cut off the ring! Kimura valiantly tries to get to the corner! The fans get more and more frustrated. Pogo and Nagasaki escalate their offense. They even use a chair as the ref is distracted! And... Kimura just kind of reaches over and gets a tag while he's in a hold.

Come on guys! Fujinami comes in, knocks guys around, gets overwhelmed by the numbers (which is a really great hallmark of momentum shifts in AJPW tags actually and could add so much to traditional southern tags where there's a comeback but the numbers game forces a second heat until the first guy can recover), but comes back, Kimura gets in, we get a second moment of heat as they go back to the injury! Maybe the first one was just a ruse to build them up and bring them down again! And no, not really. You end in a fairly fun finishing stretch with the Inazuma Leg Lariat and a pile driver on a chair and Wakamatsu getting tossed into Pogo and whatever, but the match had already slowed down to just more wrestling.

Again, I got to to take it as it is and respect what they're trying to do and judge it on its merits and I can do that, but sometimes I just wish they'd give me what is so blatant and obvious and out there. My only guess is that they didn't want to manipulate the crowd like that for some reason. They wanted it to seem so much like sport that they didn't want to have common formulae that the fans could get used to. They didn't want the fans to be able to anticipate what was going to happen next like anyone watching a RnR vs Midnight match can do. But who knows, right? I just wish they could take all of the amazing things they were capable of and just occasionally would merge them with the real possibilities of the Southern Tag, that's all.

7/25/86: Inoki vs Smirnoff: Sub five minute match and it's weird. If this was a Nitro match with Savage instead of Inoki, it'd bug me, but here Inoki taking some stuff, coming back with a big move and hitting the back brain kick and locking in the Octopus seemed somehow more emotional than the way Savage would take a bunch of stuff, have the heel miss, hit a body slam and the elbow drop. Maybe it was how Inoki was selling and trying to fight out of holds. Maybe it was the fans chanting and believing which isn't at all the same as 95 WCW. Matches like this made Inoki seem bigger while the Nitro matches made Savage seem like less than we all knew he was. Best part was Doc spitting and shouting on the outside anyway.

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8/5/86: Inoki vs Williams: Man, I feel like I've been building up to this thing forever. This did NOT make the set, by the way. It should have. Inoki knows how much of a beast Doc is, so he drives right in with the back brain kick, taking out the ref momentarily in the process. It's a cheapshot but also a necessity. Doc recovers quickly and just absolutely manhandles Inoki, just deadlifting him up off the ground and putting him in the tree of woe. Inoki contorts himself to dodge the second corner charge, though, and can recover on the outside, and that's the start of the match. It's great. From there it settles down but never really loses its energy. Inoki tries holds but Doc either powers his way out or wrestles his way out and it gets pretty dire. He even powers out of the Octopus. They do a mid-match bit where Williams hits the stampede but is too close to the ropes and Inoki gets another kick but can't capitalize. There's a gnarly double clothesline and prizefighter like exchanges of dropkicks. Doc has a way of just tossing himself at Inoki using his whole body as a weapon. It all builds to things spilling to the floor where Doc hits a killer bulldog but then gets posted and blades. He's reeling after this and it leads to a great visual of Inoki giving him a sleeper on the apron. He makes it back in but ultimately gets crushed with the knee drop and gets his foot on the rope but just after 3. Inoki lets out a primal scream after the match even as Doc claims they haven't seen the last of him. There was maybe a span in the middle where they were trading standing toeholds that could have been a little more compelling or connected to the rest of the match but overall, I came out of it happy.

8/7/86: Fujinami vs Smirnoff: 7 minutes, JIP after the entrances. Fujinami's theme always reminds me of Mysterious Cities of Gold. He had a big gash on his back and Smirnoff really honed in. Pretty good wound work when the wound's in a unique place. He had decent power offense focused on the back and Fujinami sold well, unable to mount any sort of meaningful comeback because of it (though everything he did, of course, looked instantly credible). Of course in the end, he ducked, hit the clothesline and then a belly to back for the win but it was a good journey while it lasted.

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2 hours ago, Matt D said:

8/7/86: Fujinami vs Smirnoff: 7 minutes, JIP after the entrances. Fujinami's theme always reminds me of Mysterious Cities of Gold.

Please tell me this was Macho Dragon era. They only used the vocal version once (and it's basically the puroresu equivalent of Dirk Diggler's rendition of "You Got the Touch") but the instrumental stuck around for a while.

Macho Dragon (Alt) - YouTube

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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, KinchStalker said:

Please tell me this was Macho Dragon era. They only used the vocal version once (and it's basically the puroresu equivalent of Dirk Diggler's rendition of "You Got the Touch") but the instrumental stuck around for a while.

Macho Dragon (Alt) - YouTube

It absolutely is. Also that video's nuts for doing the walking thing at the start and not timing it up to the beat.

  

20 hours ago, odessasteps said:

IIRC, Doc had a long UWF tv match w Gordy right around this time too. 

You know, I actually went and looked at some 86 UWF Doc stuff to see if the magic was there, and I think he was just being too overly coached by Watts or something. He was babyface working from underneath with big comebacks when here he was just an out of control beast.

Edited by Matt D
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8/5/86: Kimura/Fujinami (c) vs Maeda/Kido: Was this not available when the set came out or something? I could see this as a top 30 match and it's not on there. It's an important match not to have. This, maybe more than anything else I think I've seen in the footage, felt like the logical extension of the NJPW vs UWF feud. Yeah, the 5x5s might be more so. Fujinami vs Maeda might be more so. This is pretty close though. It's a really gripping version of that "no give, no space, no gaps" style. Fujinami was Fujinami. I just like watching the guy hit the ropes. I can't say that about a ton of other wrestlers. Kimura had come so far in being able to match up with this style during the year. It's hard to find new things to say about these guys by this point, and in an environment where they don't contrive narratives in their matches all that much (leave that to Inoki, I guess), and it's very much about things like the simple question of whether they can contain Maeda or keep Kido in the ring but not allow him to snatch a limb but take back over, I'm not really sure what even to say. Maybe that's why I gravitate away from this stuff. I talk a lot about how Hansen is entirely dependent upon his opponent and in some ways, the UWF guys are similar. It's different with Fujiwara because he's such a character with so many opportunities and such charisma, but the fact that Fujinami and Kimura were able to meet them at 40% of the path if not entirely halfway made this a less interesting match to write about, even if it was extremely compelling to watch. Every exchange gives question. Every impact matters. There are specific moments or exchange that are just excellent. Kido throws kicks before Maeda here, but they're caught into a dragon screw allowing the champions to take over for a while. But eventually they go to the Scorpion too early and can't stop outside interference. Kicking Maeda is a way to damage him, but he may well catch it and hit that capture exploder. There are great little iconic rope running exchanges. Maeda misses the spin wheel kick but gets it the second. Kimura hits the Inazuma Leg Lariat lightning fast. Ultimately, they need a killshot to put away even Kido, in part because Maeda is always lurking. They over expose themselves to try to get it and Kido scores a beautiful roll up out of a tombstone attempt that you'll never see again in watching wrestling for decades. This stuff is so intrinsically good and it doesn't wear out its welcome but there's a lot of other very good stuff that just connects with me a little more. I'm still glad I'm watching it. It's good for me.

Let's see Kido/Maeda defend against Mad Maxx and Super Maxx or something.

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8/5/86: Takada (c) vs Koshinaka: This was a 20+ minute match that would have probably been a quite good 15 minute match. Here's what you need to know. Koshinaka came in with a strategy. He knew that Takada could kick the soul out of him, so he had to take out the leg. How, you ask? By goading Takada in early with a slap and just eating a ton of kicks while he was strong, catching the foot, and then dropping him into a toe hold. And you know what? If they ran with it, they might have had a pretty interesting match. The problem was, Takada isn't just a strike but kind of way better on the mat than Koshinaka. Ol' Shiro kept on trying, going for a figure four or shots to the leg, but at the ten minute mark, Takada just started to unload on him in the corner. From there on in, it was sort of a delayed beginning of the end. Shiro would come back, would fight towards a superplex or even hit the butt butts and a German, but Takada just had way too much in the arsenal and in the tank. With matches like these, there is always a sense that one quick roll up or submission might end it no matter the momentum or skill differential, but nah, it was just a matter of time. Like I said though, there was a more interesting match in here where Shiro's strategy actually worked and he was able to take out Takada's leg by drawing him in. That would have taken less shooty UWF-ness though probably. Ah well.

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8/7/86: Inoki/Kimura vs Bad News/Williams: Not a ton to say about this. Williams took a little more in this one but was able to come back against mostly everything. Or if he didn't, Bad News made sure to turn the tide by slamming someone in the skull with a chair on the outside. Half of Bad News' stuff looks quite good, like his headbutt to the gut. And then he does some strikes that may have been legit technique but didn't look great in a pro wrestling setting. I like him picking guys up and slamming them onto Doc's knee. Kimura has a real problem finishing guys off after the Inazuma Leg Lariat. The fans pop for it but then he just meanders and does something else. All of this felt a little anti-climactic after the singles match honestly.

8/29/86: Black Tiger vs Takada: Yikes. They sure did a bunch of stuff. Takada had an answer to everything Rocco did. Lots of pile drivers. Rocco tried to take the leg out. It didn't work. So much noise. So much action. Some holds. This was not good. I bet Fuchi watched this shit on TV sometimes and just shook his head.

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8/29/86: Inoki/Sakaguchi vs Madd/Super Maxx: Argh, these guys again. I swear there's an Inoki chinlock in this one just because he doesn't know what to do with them. As before, there's one bad Maxx (terrible kicks) and one ok one (can take stuff and hits an elbow off the second rope). There's a manager in purple with a hockey mask, bald. Maybe Wakamatsu as he has a paper bullhorn thing. Inoki eventually has enough and after it's sort of obvious his side could win, pulls one out and tosses him over the rail. Inoki had some good looking punches in the corner to start here and just a great high dropkick later. These guys are kind of crummy but I can't wait to see the UWF team up against them too.

9/5/86: Fujinami vs Jerry Grey: Jerry Grey was pretty good. Could hang with Fujinami on the mat and based for some cool stuff. This was fairly back and forth and feels like the most credible I've ever seen Grey presented. He had that midcard run in 85 mid-south but... anyway, not a lot to say here. This didn't feel like one of those great 1980 Fujinami vs the world juniors matches but it was fine. You'd rather have a guy like Grey in there than a Maxx, let me tell you. I'd bring him back for another tour. 

9/5/86: Inoki/Kimura vs Kevin Kelly/Angel of Death: Angel of Death had a lot of manic energy. We only had some of this but the story was he kept calling out Inoki but then tagged out whenever Inoki was in there to face him. Kelly had a bearhug and could bump a bit. Not much else. Angel of death had fun offense i guess. They did a cool Hart Attack on Kimura but given the size, Angel just ran through him and didn't jump on the clothesline. You don't see that often. I suppose I'd be willing to see an Inoki vs Angel of Death match out of this. They wouldn't shut up about Brody on this show for some reason? Maybe comparing Angel of Death to him? I don't know.

Oh, here's a bonus. At the end of the Inoki vs Maxxes match, they showed a hype for the big title match where Fujinami/Kimura lost. While Fujinami had the cool pink dragon jacket for singles matches, they had matching team jackets with letters. Check them out.

DqALZq.gif

Aren't those things great?

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2 hours ago, Matt D said:

They wouldn't shut up about Brody on this show for some reason?

Brody coming back to work on this tour was a big deal. He and Snuka had bounced on the last day of the last tour of 85 and gotten banned from the company for it, but had reconciled with Nooj (for the time being).

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14 minutes ago, KinchStalker said:

Brody coming back to work on this tour was a big deal. He and Snuka had bounced on the last day of the last tour of 85 and gotten banned from the company for it, but had reconciled with Nooj (for the time being).

Argh, I thought I was free of Brody. Let me look at this.

Ok, I just have a singles match with Inoki and one with Fujinami. I can deal with that.

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I enjoy reading these. I haven't watched nearly enough mid 80's NJPW as many of you but I have enjoyed what little I've seen and reading these updates has inspired me to go on Youtube and search out more.  Great job on these Matt!

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Posted (edited)

9/5/86: Kido/Maeda vs Super/Madd Maxx: Oh boy. Ok, look, Badd Maxx might be the worst wrestler I've ever seen. Definitely the worst strikes. He reminds me of a totally untrained guy at times (and at other times he tries to do complex hammerlock exchanges, so I have no idea really). He reminds me of someone who want to pretend to do a wrestling strike when no one had ever taught him how to do one but doesn't want to hurt his opponent. And then you have Maeda and Kido trying to work around him. Maeda really just seemed to have no idea what to do and sort of rolls around and accidentally shoot DDTs him. If you told me Badd Maxx was the worst foreigner in all of Japan in the 80s, I'd believe you. Good Maxx is pretty ok here with some power moves and dropping Maeda on the top rope, etc. For some reason this can't end clean. I think it's because Kimura and Fujinami will beat them clean next show and that lets them get their heat back after the title loss? No idea. I'm going to gif some of these strikes later and show you.

9/12/86: Fujinami/Kimura vs Super/Madd Maxx: See, now this was just as bad but like six times more fun, though with some painful periods of them putting a hold on a Maxx as a mercy but boy did the Maxxes try here, doing some absolutely crazy stuff, like a Barbarian/Meng style back body drop into a pile driver, except for they couldn't really hit at at first so they just hung up with it for a while. And then Badd Maxx hit this crazy jumping knee, and ate probably the most awesome Inazuma Leg Lariat ever. Terrible, terrible match, but still fun. Here, no bad strikes since that was in the UWF guys match but here's the crazy double team, the crazy high knee, and the leg lariat.

Spoiler

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Edited by Matt D
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Posted (edited)

Brody looms, but first I have the 9/12/86 matches to watch.

9/12/86: Koshinaka vs Black Tiger: Oh god, just bring on the Brody match already. This is best summed up like so: with a few minutes left in the match, Koshinaka hit a shoulder block on Tiger. It wasn't really connected to anything they'd been doing. Koshinaka hits the ropes again, Tiger kips up, hits a clothesline. That's basically the whole match. Multiple pile drivers in and out of the ring, a superplex which had oomph behind it, plenty off the top rope. Stupid wrestling well executed. The best part was Tiger taking out Koshinaka's groin on a leapfrog that wasn't high enough after the butt butt. That made me laugh at least. I strongly dislike this stuff.

9/12/86: Inoki/Takano vs Duggan/Jerry Grey: Now this was pretty awesome. Duggan is so great in this and Grey's really good too. Just a beast. Duggan had this thing he was doing here where he just flew at people blocking their cross body attacks or something, I don't even know. Basically he was either throwing himself at people or throwing people around the ring. Grey had a spring in his step too. I kind of want to temp the NJPW cops and put this one online for you guys. 86 heel Duggan was so cool. Just crazy manic energy, with eyes bulging and calling out Inoki with TOUGH guy and then cheating with Grey instead of facing him. Really working towards the last row. All the way down to the end when Takano gets the hot tag and Inoki steamrolls through Grey and Duggan tries to get the fans to shut up as if Grey somehow had it instead of breaking up the bow and arrow. Why can't we have a long Inoki/Duggan match instead of the freaking Brody thing that's coming my way. I really do think we were robbed of a heel WWF run in 92-93. You do it in 93 where he's pissed off that everyone's accepting Luger as the All-American after being the Narcissist. Like the Murdoch turn on Dusty in 87, right? Ah well. I think we get 4 minutes of a Inoki/Duggan singles match and 60 of the freaking Brody thing.

Here's the match:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1mdRSSjpPlLy8VJiHSJdfUE-NvCnDQSzG/view?usp=sharing

Edited by Matt D
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