Jump to content
DVDVR Message Board

JustJay
 Share

Recommended Posts

19 hours ago, Mike Campbell said:

My sister in law had a damn near meltdown when she got spit up on, because it was her favorite Avenged Sevenfold T-shirt.

I had a designated feeding outfit consisting of a pair of old Levis and some sweatshirt I got at WalMart for fifteen dollars.  Always feed your kid while wearing clothes you don't mind getting puked, peed, or pooped on that you will wash a million times a day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ain't that the truth.

Said her first words today at 2 and a half months. Last week or so she's made the sound of hello/uh oh, but pulled out a fairly articulate "hello" in the midst of a phone argument with parents that shocked us both. The huge tantrum afterwards over being pulled away from Crisis on Earth X and eventually fell asleep on me instead, not quite as impressive.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, J.T. said:

I had a designated feeding outfit consisting of a pair of old Levis and some sweatshirt I got at WalMart for fifteen dollars.  Always feed your kid while wearing clothes you don't mind getting puked, peed, or pooped on that you will wash a million times a day.

You assume a girl can't pee that far.  Then you end up like one of R. Kelly's harem.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Well, my daughter turns fifteen tomorrow.  We celebrated this past weekend and took her to Dave & Busters during the aftermath of the Blizzard.  She had a ball. 

I scored on a copy of Wreck This Journal for her as well as a signed Limited Edition of One Perfect Lie.  My kid was very happy with her tribute bag.

I didn't enjoy myself that much during the celebration dinner. I spent too much time casting withering glares and intimidating stares at the two boys she beat at air hockey. 

They took their defeats rather well and there was a bit too much HEY~! YOU'RE REALLY GOOD AT THAT GAME, WANNA SIT AT OUR TABLE~?? bullshit going on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Gameplan is tonight is to use the big game (which none of us care about) as a distraction to get into a usually super crowded restaurant to celebrate the soon-to-be-16 year old stepson's birthday. It'll be the 4 month old's first real restaurant trip too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Matt D said:

Gameplan is tonight is to use the big game (which none of us care about) as a distraction to get into a usually super crowded restaurant to celebrate the soon-to-be-16 year old stepson's birthday. It'll be the 4 month old's first real restaurant trip too.

This got completely fucked by flu, by the way.

  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On ‎2‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 5:08 PM, offspring515 said:

My four year old “Dad did you watch YouTube when you were little?”

Me “No we didn’t have YouTube yet.”

Him “Oh...were you sad?”

My daughter asked me if we had video games "in the olden days when I was a kid" when she was seven years old.

When I showed her a picture of a Strider cabinet on my laptop (STRIDER HIEN, MOTHER FUCKERS~!), she replied with, "You had to pay to play them?"

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
21 hours ago, Matt D said:

As someone with a 5 year old girl, I am all in on the Disney Junior girl Rocketeer news. 

My daughter is 15 now and has transitioned from cartoons to a voracious appetite for the latest YN novels.

I probably know more about Everything, Everything and Paper Towns than I really want to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, J.T. said:

My daughter is 15 now and has transitioned from cartoons to a voracious appetite for the latest YN novels.

I probably know more about Everything, Everything and Paper Towns than I really want to.

I did a lot of YA pre-screening reading when the elder stepson was 10-14 or so. It's a whole different world from when I was that age in what's available in a post Harry Potter world. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, J.T. said:

My daughter is 15 now and has transitioned from cartoons to a voracious appetite for the latest YN novels.

I probably know more about Everything, Everything and Paper Towns than I really want to.

Should have given her my book, on second thought...

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 05/02/2018 at 3:01 PM, Red is Dead said:

Ruh roh rhaggy.

 

First wobbly tooth.

Came out two weeks later, now the one next to it is wobbling. she's going to have the reverse bugs bunny teeth, at this rate.

 

bank of toothfairy may be looking to file chapter 11, at this rate.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/28/2018 at 1:04 PM, J.T. said:

I recently re-read An Antique Vintage while I was on a lunch break, so no... that won't be happening.

WE were kidding around, but it got me thinking about a serious point as Matt mentioned pre-screening YA stuff, I'm a little bit older than you guys, so this particular horse left the barn a long time ago, (my step-sons are in their thirties).  I tried my damnedest to get them to read anythhig, anything at all, but they were having none of it.) The question or rather line of discussion that comes  up is censoring what our kids read, do you, and if so, why? Because if you have any common sense, the quickest way to get a kid to read something is by telling them that they aren't supposed to read it...

Where I'm coming from is being raised in the 1960s/1970s by parents, who while pretty strict, still had some odd ideas, that in retrospective, I've sort of embraced as being eminently practical... For one, they thought that if you could get through the library system it was okay, whatever "it" happened to be. The end result of this was that after reading anything that looked remotely like science fiction in the Ballerd Branch of the library, I started ordering stuff from the main branch but pretty well worked my way through those holding in under a year. Thank God for the "book allowance"! My regular $2.00 a week which I could spend on whatever I wanted to (read: baseball cards & comics) was supplemented by $2.00 that had to be spent on books, (like that was going to be a problem, finding stuff that I wanted to buy.) Keep in mind that  a large part of my childhood coincided with comics of $0.15  to $0.25 and ACE Doubles were like $1.25 and the Ballantine Adult Fantasy series ranged from $0.95 to $1.25. Regular paperbacks hovered around $0.75. Lest one thinks that I sneaked off to spend my allowance on porn, that was simply not the case. Despite this "book allowance" stuff kicking in when I was 8 or 9 (and finally allowed to take the bus downtown by myself), my interests as a kid reading on a grad-school level was still pretty much limited to SF on the fiction side and Classic Mythology on the non-fiction side. The only time I recall this permissiveness back-firing was ordering a lovely tome entitled A History of Torture Throughout the Ages by George something-or-other Scott... My mom (who was usually in charge of the library excursions, frowned and said that it sounded "disgusting" and asked "how did you ever hear of such a thing?" "I looked it up in the card catalog, I DO know how to use the Dewey System, after all..." (Yeah, I was a pretty strange kid...) The librarian warned that the book was kept under lock and key at the main branch as "most people find the illustrations to be pretty upsetting." I should have listened, the damn think fucked up my sleeping for weeks... The fact that I remember the full title and most of the authors' name fifty years after the fact is ample evidence of the impression made. Still, that being said, I think I still agree with my parents' basic philosophy of "let the kids read whatever they want to, they're going to anyway, but try and have a discussion about the potentially objectionable tome and why they might have some questions about the content, and w'ed try hell to have a post-reading discussion about the book. So does this philosophy make me a terrible parent? There's stuff out there that I find objectionable, but most of this is of a hypothetical nature anyway, as the boys aren't big readers, my nephew is a pot-head who won't tough anything that doesn't say "graphic novel" or "manga" somewhere on the cover, What'd really weird is how far apart our tastes are in the same media, to the point that's it's difficult to find mutual points of interest. When one party starts from the standpoint of "Neil Gaiman is boring because he's always referencing a bunch of stuff that nobody's read..." "Well  Casey, that's why I like Gaiman, I've read all the material that he riffs on! Aren't you interested in further reading to check out some of this other material?" "No, if I want to read about Egyptian mythology or any of that old stuff, I'd go to the library,I wan't to read the story that I just bought and not feel like I've got to read a bunch of old stuff to understand what's going on." He's pretty dismissive of Astro City on the grounds that they feel like "JSA stories before they teamed up or something, there'd no big story happening , just a bunch of little stuff that isn't interesting." He does like some domestic product, speaks highly of Faust and all the Evil Ernie and related material and actually digs something from my buddy, Lee... He's a big fan of Grub Girl. If you're not familiar with the character, I'll say just two words: "zombie prostitute". That will cause you to do one of two things, a.) throw up in your mouth a little bit after the concept sinks in. or b.) rush to the LCS despite the snow, because  you've gotta check this out right now, you sick little monkey...

Years ago when our birth son was on up to Seattle for a visit (he's never lived with us, long story...) would have been 1996-97, making him 15-16 at the time, as Goon had just been published and my buddy, (who was then living in our  basement, Lee Seymour, better known to the world in general as "Edward Lee") had published "Header" just the year before. Corey read the blurbs on the cover of Goon, handed the book back and said "That sounds pretty sick, why do you write stuff like that?" I told him the Evil Dead comparison, " basically we're not being serious, we're just grossing people out because we can! And we get paid really well for doing so, like Lee did with this little book last year, (pointing to a copy of Header, which poses the question on the back of the book: "What's a header?"  Corey shook his head and said, "I don't need to read this to know it's gotta have something to do with skull-fucking, doesn't it?"  I just smiled and nodded.  "You guys write some nasty shit, if my girl saw me reading something like this, I'd get dumped...not next week, not tomorrow, but RIGHT NOW... You guys won't feel bad if I don't read these, will you?" Smart kid... 

So the question that's rolling around my brain hypothetically is: "Are we doing a better job as parents hiding ugliness or explaining it as best we can and pointing out that there are different ways for dealing with it, one of which is humor..."

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't really screen YA books, because my kid has a fairly good head on her shoulders and I know that if she has issues with something she's read, she'll either talk to me or her mom.  If it is something sexual in nature, understandably she feels more comfortable talking to her mom.

Horror by nature is aberrant and that is to get the reader to appreciate the natural.  . 

If my daughter is going to read a story that has a sexual encounter in it, trust me, I'd rather that story be The Fault In Our Stars rather than Rawhead Rex.

I'd be lying if I said that I was ready to talk my daughter about that one thing that happened in Apt Pupil.. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't had time to really delve into this. Let me hit two points quickly though.

1. For the most part, when I pre-read, I do it not for content but for quality. Are there some things I've come across where I decided it'd be better to wait a year or two before he read it? Yes. (Doctorow's Pirate Cinema is an example of this). In general though it's just because there's so much out there and I didn't want him to read crap. 

2. It is increasingly hard to get a kid to read. This is even in our family. I have a teenager that wants to spend his time watching other people do things on youtube (or even watching other reacting to other people doing things on youtube). There's such a notion of being part of something and always socially engaged. A lot of the games he plays are games where you can build something (minecraft giving way to space engineers or what not) but it's gotten much harder to get him to read things at 15-16 than it was at 11-12, despite giving him good stuff, and when he does read, he'd much rather reread things he's already read than read something new, let alone challenge himself with something that's bigger/longer/more laborious. And this is our kid so he's already inclined towards it. There's just so much content out there at someone's fingertips in 2018. He could watch dozens of shows or dozens of animes or play dozens of games. So, when he was a few years younger, pre-reading and guiding him into the good stuff when he does read felt like the way to go. Maybe we should have just forbid it all and he would still be doing it more? I don't know. He is working his way (slowly) through the second Mistborn book now though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/5/2018 at 12:20 PM, J.T. said:

I don't really screen YA books, because my kid has a fairly good head on her shoulders and I know that if she has issues with something she's read, she'll either talk to me or her mom.  If it is something sexual in nature, understandably she feels more comfortable talking to her mom.

Horror by nature is aberrant and that is to get the reader to appreciate the natural.  . 

If my daughter is going to read a story that has a sexual encounter in it, trust me, I'd rather that story be The Fault In Our Stars rather than Rawhead Rex.

I'd be lying if I said that I was ready to talk my daughter about that one thing that happened in Apt Pupil.. 

The fact that she'll talk to either you or her mom tells me all I need to know. The kid has a good head on her shoulders and I wouldn't worry about any choices she makes of what to read. If it turns out to be disturbing shit, she's going to ask questions about it which is a good thing. I've resigned myself to the fact that I am basically alone in a family of non-readers. Neither step-son has the slightest interest in reading a book, when they were kids they would go through the motions of borrowing a book and returning it after a sufficient amount of time had passed to convince me that they'd actually read it, subsequent conversations would convince me that nothing of the kind had taken place, but that they were seeking my approval by seemingly engaging in an activity that I obviously put a lot of stock in.  So in my case it was never worrying about WHAT they were reading, but more a situation of wishing that they were reading ANYTHING. Honest to God, "Rawhead Rex" would have been infinitely better in my estimation than not reading anything. Hell, if they had expressed an interest in Verotika Comics or Faust,I'd have cheerfully bought  them every issue. I think they may have picked up an issue or two of High Times for specific articles, but that would be more under the heading of "instructional literature" than reading for pleasure.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...