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2022 Movies Discussion Thread (v.2.0)


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On 12/3/2022 at 6:52 PM, Curt McGirt said:

Thank you. 😄

It's weird man. The VVitch was so good. I was stoked for The Lighthouse, and it turned out to be a bad Bergman parody. I was still hopeful for Northman, and man, The 13th Warrior did a better job of telling old Teutonic tales. This was like the anti-Valhalla Rising. I hope Eggers gets his shit back together eventually...

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On 12/1/2022 at 1:15 PM, odessasteps said:

The 2022 Sight and Sound poll results are out. 

A new #1. 

  Reveal hidden contents

Jeanne Dielman

Or does that discussion go in the snooty Physical Media thread? 🙂

I am both surprised and happy. Not overly joyous because I find these lists more fun than taken too overly seriously. But yeah, I really love that film. A casually exhausting marathon. I have it in my top 15ish.

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Yeah.  Already.  It's Day 511 (and counting) of Some Stuff or Something, The Nineties in Verbs Edition.

Your Baby's Dirty Diaper

Tammy - Adam McKay doesn't have as bad a garbage-to-quality ratio as Danny McBride, but it isn't great, either, especially with a turd like this floating in the bowl.  Hey, why don't you make another joke about how Melissa McCarthy is fat?  It's cool, we have time while she prat-falls or tries to hurdle something.  I would say Mark Duplass looks like he's shot up on the same horse tranquilizers that Natalie Portman had for Attack of the Clones, but then I realized he's always got that face.  The bath salts joke is funny; the rest is...well, not.  Avoid.

Four Christmases - Truth is, I kinda want to like this movie.  When it's just Vince Vaughn and Reese Witherspoon it kinda works, depending on your tolerance for Vaughn doing his usual talk-too-much schtick.  The first 10 minutes or so are funny, and the Taboo board game scene is Hall-of-Fame-worthy, but the rest is just...eh.  Had it been even close to consistent through the other 70+ minutes of film, this could have been a pretty rewatchable Christmas movie, but the moments worth seeing are just too few and far between to make it worth the slog.  I would say it needed a serious rewrite, but any movie with 4 screenwriters is already massively overcooked as often as not, and this was no exception.

AXE Body Spray Instead of Shower

13 Going on 30 - Fortunately, there are very few moments in this movie where you think a more appropriate title for the film would be "Mentally, She's Thirteen".  Unlike 17 Again, this is far zanier and light-hearted, which works in its favor to some degree, largely because there isn't really a good pairing here to make the plot work *that* well, and it's not like the script is any good.  This is far from Mark Ruffalo's best work, and somehow it's hard to buy him as The Guy for either Lynn Collins or Jennifer Garner, and yet, here we are (and all this despite him being in the highly raunchy In the Cut just the year before and being pretty believable with Meg Ryan).  It's a bit weird to see Andy Serkis as the gay editor-in-chief, but he kind of makes it work; did they mean to cast Andy Dick, but he harassed or assaulted someone on set as per usual, so they just cast another Andy in his place?  I don't know.   Otherwise, this is pretty forgettable; not the absolute worst, but not worth revisiting on any level.   Big remains undefeated.

My Big Fat Greek Wedding - Yeah, this was a week for crossing off some hit movies.  This has some amount of charm to it, not unlike what you'd get out of a Julia Roberts movie, but is it possible to be racist against your own people with how you portray them?  With the amount of self-loathing on display here, I'd think the answer is probably 'yes'.  Nearly everyone is just one stereotype or another, even the WASPy husband's relatives.  Plus you've got your tedious narration and other, similar cliches throughout.  But, there are times when something deeper breaks through and hits you in the feels, largely due to the relationship between the main character and her (grown but still) little brother, who is the one person who always finds a way to be genuinely encouraging and uplifting to her, even if he's playing to type when dealing with everyone else in the whole picture.

This Gun for Hire (1942) - Apparently, this was Alan Ladd's big break, but I don't think it's one that holds up particularly well as breakout roles go.  Hollywood's just done so many different permutations of noirs that this one doesn't seem to have anything special about it, Graham Greene adaptation or not.  I hadn't seen any Veronica Lake movies before, so that was kind of nice, though I have to say I agree with Bud Smith's assessment of her.  Laird Cregar kind of steals the show if anyone does, as a sort of "King John in the animated Robin Hood" effete little jerk who gets in way over his head as the middle man for some bad news.  But hey, at least this was short.

That'll Do, Pig

Days of Being Wild - I didn't know this was the first film that eventually led to In the Mood for Love and 2046, but...well...I *guess* I can kind of see how it's connected.  A little.  I don't really think 2046 is all that good, either, and this felt kind of disappointing for a Wong Kar-wai film, like he was very much still figuring things out that he would eventually improve upon in Mood and Chungking Express (which has a lot of the same shifts in tone and focus).  Ultimately, I just didn't think the characterization is terribly intriguing; too much time is spent on a couple of characters (Yuddy and Mimi) who are both sort of disasters, but not in that Richard Burton-Elizabeth Taylor fun-to-watch-the-cars-crash way, though not for a lack of trying on their parts.  Andy Lau and Maggie Cheung are more interesting, and, despite being more direct, they're somehow also more mysterious, since they have something like real emotional depth and maturity, and so their behaviors aren't just sleazy, thoughtless, selfish nonsense where they take their feelings out on others every second of every day.  Plus, the age on this kind of shows, as it's clear Wong still didn't have much in the way of budget, and there are a couple of "action" scenes that feel like they're badly, badly copied out of something from the very very back of Jackie Chan's closet (down to the stock punch sounds).  The movie looks pretty great, though, so hooray for Christopher Doyle as always.  I don't know; if you dig your sadboi stuff more than I do, maybe this is up your alley, but it felt a bit flat to me.

Yeah, But...

Bringing Out the Dead && - Gotta make this HBO Max subscription count for something!  This is still pretty clearly bottom-half Scorsese for me, but that's more a testament to how much good stuff he's made than anything that's wrong with this.  I'd still have it a damn sight higher than Taxi Driver.  It's funny that Schrader wrote this, because it actually feels a little like Light Sleeper to me, stuck in a night that never fully becomes day.  I don't have a lot of female examples of Actors I Can't Stand the way I do men, but Patricia Arquette is 1000% at the tip-top of that list.  Having said that, this might be my favorite role of hers, since she's so screwed-up and brittle that she feels like a great match for Cage's 'grief mop' and they have instant chemistry.  If she deserved an Academy Award for anything, it might have been this instead of Boyhood.  Cage is great, Scorsese turns in maybe the best "director injecting himself into a movie" bit part ever, Ving Rhames is...completely fucking batshit, the scenes with the Captain who won't fire him are pitch-perfect, and the visuals are pretty wild; and when it's not being demented and insane, the whole thing also felt to me like a proto-Wire, a portrayal of a city unable and unwilling to get the fuck out of its own way long enough to lift its head.  If there was anything about it I didn't like, though, it's the long wind-up at the start - the Tedious Narration (surprise surprise) and the John Goodman section just take too long before getting to the stuff that genuinely works.

One Maple-Frosted Donut

Gone Girl && - I've been meaning to rewatch this for a while, since I didn't do so for the 2010s poll and felt like that was a bit of dropping the ball on my part.  There are a few things that really stood out this time.  First was how savagely this criticizes that certain subset of New Yorker-reading New Yorker that Amy & Nick were trying to be when things were peachy; it doesn't last too long since the direction of the plot steers far away from it, but Gillian Flynn seemed like she had an axe or 57 to grind with somebody.  The second was an added detail to the ever-wonderful Carrie Coon, who just seemed like a concerned family member and sounding board the first time but is pretty clearly Nick's version of Amazing Amy in his own life: the sibling who doesn't make selfish choices, the one who's reasonable and decent and thinks of others, the one who's supportive even when she's falling apart (usually Nick's doing).  No wonder Amy & Nick are so alike.  And the third detail is that *almost nobody* reads this movie right!  It's treated - has almost always been, even in the initial reviews - like a tale of two halves, split around the car ride and the plan, one side his and one side hers, but it's not.  It's right there slapping everybody in the face the whole time, and Tyler Perry even says it out loud(!!), and people still whiff hard that the journal entries actually function to split the entire film into a constant tug-of-war of "he said, she said".  It's just that the journal entries take longer to catch up with where Nick starts, since Amy is so much more concerned with shaping narrative and making herself into a reliable narrator, despite the fact that she's anything but.  That they also backfill the relationship is merely convenient for us. Oh, and yeah, career-best performances from nearly everyone involved and an awesome score, so it's still pretty damn great.

Raise the Red Lantern - If I see this again or spend some more time thinking about it, I could see myself punching this one up another notch.  I've honestly been trying to watch this movie for something like 20 or 25 years, but it's been embroiled in so many rights and release fiascos that I never felt like spending money to buy a copy.  But hey, it's on Amazon for free, so, regardless of *which* release this is (I'm guessing not one of the better ones), at least it's there.  And oooof, is this a gut punch or ten.  I don't know if it was the setting or the set design or the graininess of the transfer, but it seemed quite hard to get a gauge on when this was taking place for a decent chunk of the movie, maybe the first 40 minutes.  Until you see a record player appear, it's hard to be at all certain, but then again, that only works in its favor, since the point of a story like this is that it's been happening and is still happening.  It could have been 100 years ago or it could have been 300, or longer: depending on where you are in the world, we're still there, lending power to people and structures and situations that only exist to keep some people under the thumbs of other, "better" people.  I can't help but wondering if the showrunners for Handmaid's Tale cite this as one of their influences.  The acting is top-shelf, but the direction and set-up are just...whew, it's hard to get a lot better than this.  Yimou's movies are always pretty great-looking, so I wonder how this looked on the big screen back then.  I really wish the people running Criterion would figure out what it's going to take to get their hands on a copy that they can do a proper remaster on, because this is one of the more deserving films in need of a major overhaul and a major chance to shine again.

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19 minutes ago, Contentious C said:

It's basically just, "Do I have time?" and "Have I seen this?"  The rewatches are nearly always something that's been on my mind for a while.

I wasn't sure if you had a process.  I actually love it that you don't.  It's cool that you're documenting it all here so you'll have a record of it all.  I've been trying to get a bit of a list going based on the stuff you've liked.

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On 12/7/2022 at 10:09 PM, Contentious C said:

 

Four Christmases - Truth is, I kinda want to like this movie.  When it's just Vince Vaughn and Reese Witherspoon it kinda works, depending on your tolerance for Vaughn doing his usual talk-too-much schtick.  The first 10 minutes or so are funny, and the Taboo board game scene is Hall-of-Fame-worthy, but the rest is just...eh.  Had it been even close to consistent through the other 70+ minutes of film, this could have been a pretty rewatchable Christmas movie, but the moments worth seeing are just too few and far between to make it worth the slog.  I would say it needed a serious rewrite, but any movie with 4 screenwriters is already massively overcooked as often as not, and this was no exception.

 

I've come to put it right in my middle-of-the-pack-hey-it's-a-Christmas-movie-but-we-don't-HAVE-to-watch-it-every-year pile. It's biggest pluses are its relative lightness (the biggest crisis in the movie is resolved really quickly and relatively painlessly), the cast (lots of people in here!) and Vince Vaughn's performance (which I still like but like you said, would determine on your tolerance of Vaughn's schtick). It is a rather polarizing film in our family: my sister LOVES it, my dad HATES it and will never watch it again. My favourite little throwaway easter egg is that, since this was directed by the same guy who directed 'King of Kong', he finds a tiny, non-speaking role for Steve Wiebe (he even gets to play video games). It's weird to see Jon Voight now after his weird Trump-worshipping stuff and even weirder to see Kevin from 'The Office' speaking at a normal cadence.

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Here I go again, on my own.  It's Day 518 (and counting) of Not Quoting Whitesnake Ever Again, Prisons of Our Own Making Edition.

Your Baby's Dirty Diaper

Babylon A.D. - I really expected this to track lower, especially after I saw the opening credits and the name Matthieu Kassovitz; what a weird career, from starring in stone-cold classic Amélie to directing stone-cold Mount Flushmore movie, Gothika.  I suppose this isn't as terrible as the latter since it's an adaptation (from a graphic novel?  I didn't bother to look it up), so staying even a little true to the source probably meant he had a leash on how much he could fuck things up.  And fuck them up, he does - the first scene of the film is dumb as Hell and the ending matches it for stupidity.  But what's in between is just run-of-the-mill dumb sci-fi pap, not notably godawful sci-fi pap.  This may not even be Vin Diesel's worst movie (haven't seen The Last Witch Hunter...yet!).

That'll Do, Pig (super-sized!)

Outside In - I guess there was no getting around Jay Duplass being in this, since he co-wrote it, but he's probably the weakest link in a movie that's otherwise pretty damn well done all around.  Edie Falco is, of course, the Queen of Things Left Unsaid, and this role is no different; plus, she pairs up a good bit of her time with Kaitlyn Dever, which is the winning combination you should expect it to be.  The story itself is a bit like if someone had taken Rectify and tried really hard to make it as unserious as a movie about a felon could be.  Sometimes that works, and the humor is in the right wheelhouse, but it isn't always quite right.  And this doesn't - can't - steer entirely clear of heavy moments, but those are usually pulled off with enough care and delicacy that they work.  It's a totally different kind of film than Sword of Trust was, but I think I like this a bit better out of the late Lynn Shelton's catalog. 

In the Shadow of the Moon - This is a re-attempt, since I tried to watch this probably a year ago or more and was bored to tears by the first 45 minutes.  Well, shows what I know; this isn't half-bad.  It isn't always half-good, either, as it's probably *too* serious, especially in those early sections, but by the time the details of the plot start unraveling themselves (and it does take a good hour to really get there), there's an interesting ethical conundrum and a beating heart in the middle of it all.  And as far as sci-fi stuff goes, this is a little easier to take seriously than Babylon A.D., since the acting is on a different level and it actually follows its own rules (mostly - there are still a few plot holes).  That said, if making movies like this is part of what pushed Netflix into spendthrift mode, maybe they should have made some better choices.

The Matrix: Resurrections - Hmm.  What to do with this?  Given the flailing shitshow Warner Bros/Discovery is becoming, I suppose the answer is, "Nothing," since it seems unlikely they'll ever have the audacity to make something as nutso and self-referential as this again.  And is all that meta (that is so meta, even this acronym) actually worth sitting through 150 minutes of fan service and rehashes and prettifying things we've already seen before?  Well...sometimes.  The acting is better in this, aside from the lack of Laurence Fishburne; Jessica Henwick is an interesting cypher for the audience, Carrie-Anne Moss and Jonathan Groff hardly ever steer you wrong, and honestly, this might be one of Keanu's 3 or 4 best performances.  And that's definitely true in the otherwise too-long-and-too-flabby first hour: you acutely sense that Keanu is as weary of the presence of Neo in his life as Thomas Anderson is.  As for the rest...well, it's too busy being cute or clever or BIG BOOM! to actually have something to say, and when it does try to say something, it's only ever in the form of some cameo asshole who literally shouts it at you.  The Wachowskis had one fucking terrific idea and rode it hard, but ever since, this entire franchise has really, really needed a steadier hand to rein in its worst impulses and make hay with its best ones.  This is no exception.

Butter - This starts off on the wrong foot in a couple of ways; first, with a framing device that gets jettisoned for a slightly different one about 5 minutes in, never to return; and second, by trying far too hard to come off like an Alexander Payne-wannabe sort of film.  Oh, and the kid in it isn't that great, either.  But aside from those things, this is one of the funnier movies I've watched in the last several months.  It has the good sense to take a totally absurd concept and find even darker and more screwed-up places to go with it (just check the last entry from the Picklers).  And Hugh Jackman probably needed to be in about 10 minutes more of the film, because his two big scenes are better than almost everything else in the movie.  There are subplots, like the daughter and Olivia Wilde, that feel underdone, but most of it works better than I would have initially expected.  Hardly great, but hardly the biggest waste of time, either.

Cutter's Way - Aside from one or two important pieces of this, I think this would sink firmly into garbage territory, since the plot is a thin gruel of noir and 70s stereotypes with a little bit of archetyping that is stolen straight from Moby-Dick, of all things.  With lesser people involved, it would probably have sucked pretty hard.  But, instead, John Heard turns in one of the most deranged and oddball performances of the 80s as Captain Ahab-turned-alcoholic-and-disabled-Vietnam-vet.  Jeff Bridges is just along for the ride, man, in a "connect the dots to The Big Lebowski" sort of role for him, since his character is in the middle of everything but is also a complete dumbass.  So no, he's not the big star: it's the Dad from Home Alone who takes this from shoddy to slow-motion car crash.  Lisa Eichhorn is pretty great as Heard's wife, who's just as emotionally scarred as he is physically scarred, from dealing with years of his antics.  And the one thing I do like about the plot is that it doesn't trouble itself with answers: it tells you what's going on, expects you to just go on the ride without ever getting any clarity or "a-ha" moments like a more standard thriller, and the sheer insanity of each scene is enough to propel you into the next crazy clusterfuck.  Definitely a movie that needs to be in an episode of "How Did This Get Made?" because studios don't make things like this anymore.

F/X && - I'm counting this as a rewatch, because I imagine I've seen big chunks of this on TV several times over the years, but sitting down to watch it through, I don't think I'd ever seen it start to finish before.  I don't think it has aged particularly well, although some of the stunt stuff is neat, just to get a little glimpse behind the curtain.  But the story is pretty boring for the most part and goes where you'd expect.  The only real saving grace here is the ending, which has a few moments of real 'fuck-you' power to them, like the super glue on the gun and keeping the mask so they could steal the money.  It just feels at times like a big middle finger to various structures of power, especially the FBI and the NYPD, who come off looking like total assholes, and I'm good with that.  But if this movie pulled off any real stunt, it's in trying to take THE GUY WHO VOICED THE SMUCKERS COMMERCIALS FOR SO LONG HE BECAME A LICH MADE OUT OF STRAWBERRY PRESERVES and turning him into THE FUCKING BIG BAD.  I mean, who dreams up something like that?!?!?!?

Yeah, But...

Elvis - Ah, Baz Luhrmann; when I chastised modern directors for not being ballsy enough after Do the Right Thing, I clearly wasn't talking about this guy.  This movie's sometimes a mess, and I think Hanks' performance is so strange that it could be make-or-break for some people, especially given how much attention is paid to him.  And I feel like this does a bit of a disservice to his relationships with his family, which nearly all feel like they don't get enough time to percolate.  But the rest of it...man, there have been a lot of movies about Elvis, but, as someone who isn't (or wasn't) necessarily much of a fan, this is the first such film that actually made me appreciate what a compelling talent he was.  I haven't seen The Whale, but I don't think I'll need to to feel bad if Austin Butler gets totally frozen out of any major awards due to Brendan Fraser.  But the biggest star here, fittingly, is the music, because this whole movie is just suffused with love for what he did, and his love for making and appreciating music is quickly infectious.  I have my share of qualms with the ending, too, as I wonder where the details of it really come from: family, Parker, journalists?  It makes it feel like Elvis just gave up on himself at some stage, and that's starkly at odds with a lot of the rest of the movie.  Then again, maybe that's the point.

One Maple-Frosted Donut

The Illusionist (2010) - Start by talking about Amélie, end by talking about Amélie - all is right in my world.  This movie is almost the anti-Amélie, though: instead of being big and bold and brash and full of heart, this is quiet and ponderous and darkly unable at times to pull its gaze away from those left behind by a changing post-war society.  There's nearly no dialogue - not any of real consequence, that's for sure - so you're left to your own devices to puzzle out the various relationships and connections that are made and just as quickly broken in this movie.  Some of them are sugary and silly and strange, but others - especially in the last 10-15 minutes - absolutely gut you with how easy it is to see this collection of weirdos get smashed on the rocks of a world that doesn't really see them anymore.  The greatest and cruelest illusion here is happiness, and the dividing line between those who move forward and those who suffer seems to be whether or not one keeps lying to themselves about their illusions.  I can't really speak to the way the film's structured or its references and allusions, since I haven't seen anything Jacques Tati did, but you don't really need that to get your heart broken by the ending here.

Edited by Contentious C
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Yeah the book that Babylon AD is based on (Babylon Babies by Maurice Dantec) is far better than that piece of dreck that Vin Diesel made.  There is some fleeting fun in discovering that it's Gérard Depardieu playing Gorsky and that he is nearly unrecognizable under all of those prosthetics.

Vin also gets one or two savage lines of dialogue that deserved to be in a better movie.

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10 hours ago, Contentious C said:

But what's in between is just run-of-the-mill dumb sci-fi pap, not notably godawful sci-fi pap.  This may not even be Vin Diesel's worst movie (haven't seen The Last Witch Hunter...yet!).

I'd say this and Witch Hunter are pretty equally awful, one's sci-fi awful and the other's fantasy awful.

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Have been on a big 90s thriller kick in the last week. Not going to do a big review thing, this is just what I've watched.

The Last Seduction - somehow this slipped past me. I always intended to watch it and I was a horndog teen when it came out so I don't know why I never got around to it. Maybe the best erotic thriller ever? Probably not shocking to say Linda Fiorentino absolutely owns. A modern noir where the lead is the femme fatale and the heavy? And it doesn't fuck around with a lot of exposition? And its hot as fuck, even with the presence of Peter Berg? Perfect. As I was watching I kept thinking about how if it was made today, they'd waste so much time setting up the drug deal at the beginnig. Why they decided to do it, where they go the drugs from, etc. We never even meet the loan shark that Pullman got the initial funds from and who's presence hangs over the entire movie and we are better for it.

Shattered - Another really good one and such a fun mystery. Bob Hoskins and Joanne Whalley being amazing make up for the fact that it stars one of our most boring actors in Tom Berenger.

China Moon - The one I watched first and started this kick, but frankly a disappointment. Baby Benicio Del Toro giving Rami Malek vibes and Charles Dance's hilariously horrendous Louisiana accent is all it has going for it.

Fear - Just a terrible disappointment. Such high hopes for "psychic hunts down a serial killer who also has psychic powers" but its just boring and bad. I watched it for Ally Sheedy, but her performance is comical in its twitchiness. At least Stan Shaw was around.

Desperate Hours - For a supposed super genius, Mickey Rourke is maybe the stupidest criminal in movie history. Yeah man, just let people come and go from the house, that's not going to blow up in your face at all. Also includes the most egregious example of "there's no sex in this movie but we need to get some tits in here" that I've ever seen. Mickey is escaping from prison and using his lawyer, Kelly Lynch, as a shield/hostage. At one point they trip and her shirt just completely rips open for no reason at all. Then later she has to sit there and have a whole ass conversation topless while she gets a wire taped to her, which I'm pretty sure they can do without you needing to get all the way naked. I feel bad for you Kelly Lynch, hopefully the pay was decent. Also maybe the most over-the-top trigger happy cops in any movie ever.

Sister, Sister - Into the 80s here and this one was such a different tone from everything else. Family drama ghost story with lots of murder in the bayou? I don't know I can of zoned in and out of this one. Definitely on the lower end of Jennifer Jason Leigh's 80s output.

All American Murder - Not a thriller but it got lumped into the recommendations and boy howdy am I sure glad it did. More in the Gotcha!/War Games genre of teen gets caught up in something and has to save himself. Troublemaker on his last chance at a new college, falls for the popular girl, she gets murdered and he's blamed. Murders keep piling up as he tries to clear his name. Christopher Walken at maybe his most Christoper Walkenest as the detective investigating who is kind of on his side, but also giving him enough rope to hang himself if he is guilty. Way gorier and darker than I expected and the lead kid actually manages to hold his own with Walken. Richard Kind Alert! A million stars, big recommendation, its fun as fuck.

If you ever want to hear Christopher Walken shout "I never forget a face, especially one I've sat on" into a bullhorn, this is the movie for you.

Edited by elizium
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Just now, Curt McGirt said:

Just got through The Banshees of Inisherin. It's clearly the best film of 2022. 

I also never want to watch it again, ever. It's on The List. If you've had a year like I have, this is gonna crush you. 

Yeah, not the repeatability of In Bruges or The Guard. 

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Don't see a Box Office thread, but in  Avatar 2: Electric Boogaloo made $134M domestic and $300.5M foreign.  

That's about half of what Spider-man VIII (and III) made last year.  

Though that's a pretty good number, I still haven't seen any analysts saying if this was a good opening for it. 

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Fear City needed to swap Tom Berenger and Billy Dee Williams's roles. Have Billy Dee play the stripper agent and Tom the cop, because that movie needed a lot more Billy Dee and a lot less Tom. The killer being a white martial arts dork who kills people with things like katanas got a lol out of me

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