Jump to content
DVDVR Message Board
The Natural

Disney buys Fox confirmed.

Recommended Posts

21 minutes ago, Ace said:

There actually was concern in the Rocky Horror community.

 

Parse this for me? Those people want new content?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Matt D said:

Parse this for me? Those people want new content?

"Those people"?

I sense contempt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Matt D said:

Parse this for me? Those people want new content?

He's probably talking about the shitty RHPS thing that aired on normal television and sucked because it couldn't be as risqué as the movie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, J.T. said:

He's probably talking about the shitty RHPS thing that aired on normal television and sucked because it couldn't be as risqué as the movie.

Well, yeah, that should have never been done by Fox in the first place. 

No contempt, Jae. I like Rocky Horror as much as the next person, probably more so considering who the next person might be, but it's one  of those things I think should be corporately untouched and fan-driven in how it's shown, etc. That's actually saying something too because I HAVE come to have contempt for fan-fiction in general (I get how it can create a sense of ownership and representation for those who don't originally have it with the text, but it still feels off to me somewhat, which could admittedly be a me problem. In general, I'm totally fine with well done corporate-driven representation attempts, so long as the quality's there, though. It's all complicated. Anyway, fan ownership/engagement of RHPS is a big exception to that rule for me.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I assume Rocky Horror fans be more concerned about how licensing to screen the film will change under Disney ownership(who are notorious hard asses in this regard)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, jaedmc said:

I assume Rocky Horror fans be more concerned about how licensing to screen the film will change under Disney ownership(who are notorious hard asses in this regard)?

Ok. That's what I was trying to figure out. We were glad to see them lose the rights for the Miyazaki films, for instance, since we got to take the kids to a bunch of them in the theater this year which wouldn't have been possible otherwise. It was presented as part of the "R" rated discussion which is what threw me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, jaedmc said:

I assume Rocky Horror fans be more concerned about how licensing to screen the film will change under Disney ownership(who are notorious hard asses in this regard)?

Why would this change?  Couldn't Disney just release it under one of their R Friendly distributors?

I was a little concerned about the future of Deadpool until it dawned on me that, "Oh, they can still keep the franchise rated a hard R and go with another production / distribution umbrella."

10 minutes ago, Matt D said:

Ok. That's what I was trying to figure out. We were glad to see them lose the rights for the Miyazaki films, for instance, since we got to take the kids to a bunch of them in the theater this year which wouldn't have been possible otherwise. It was presented as part of the "R" rated discussion which is what threw me.

Okay, what now? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The rating isn't the problem, it's how they give out the license to screen publicly and for how much. 

Disney has a history of making the biggest demands of theatres for the right to show their films. You can google The Last Jedi licensing dispute or the Avengers Age of Ultron dispute, to see more details.

Like Matt pointed out, we could not go see the Miyazaki films in theatres. They just didn't offer them up which allowed them to charge premium prices on the blurays. When they lost the rights this past year, Shout Factory put out cheaper blurays and now The Music Box is showing a 35 mm retrospective at the end of this month. 

I would hope that they don't give that much of a shit about Rocky Horror midnight screenings, but it could potentially be a headache.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aha, the fog lifts.  We're talking company policy, not content.

And yeah, Jae, I agree with you on all points.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Matt D said:

People who worry about what this means for R rated movies need to find more fulfilling things to do with their lives.

The same can be said for people who are all YEAH X-MEN!1!

Fewer movie studios is not a good thing, I don't know how you can argue it is. This is a wrestling board so let's say WWE being the only player in town didn't really help wrestling overall.. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I'm not thrilled with this at all. Disney needs to be broken up, it's getting ridiculously big and while I like that I'm able to fund Fox/Murdoch less than before I don't like media consolidation in any form.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The regional sports networks have the rights to show a combined 44 sports team across the NBA, MLB and NHL. So they get to dip into that. The theory I've read is that it bolsters their eventual launch of ESPN Plus. I've read some other ideas but nothing that shows hard numbers that make it a worthwhile decision.

My theory is that Murdoch is dumping them because their over inflated prices aren't worth the trouble, and it's just a deal sweetner for him, so Disney can get the other shit they actually want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Niners Fan in CT said:

Fewer movie studios is not a good thing, I don't know how you can argue it is. This is a wrestling board so let's say WWE being the only player in town didn't really help wrestling overall.. 

WWE being the only major player in town helped tremendously. 

ROH, NWA, LU, and New Japan wouldn't be upping their game to compete for audience share  if the WWE juggernaut weren't around to provide a sterling example of what not to do.

30 minutes ago, jaedmc said:

My theory is that Murdoch is dumping them because their over inflated prices aren't worth the trouble, and it's just a deal sweetner for him, so Disney can get the other shit they actually want.

Simple answer is that Murdoch is a traditional media guy that does not want the financial burden of producing movies or television shows.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I mean, no shots at anybody here, but if your primary response to this is YAY SUPERHERO MOVIES, you're not seeing the forest for the trees.  This is terrible for consumers and terrible for people who work in the industry, especially people who want to create things outside of the Disney content grist mill.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, EVA said:

Yeah, I mean, no shots at anybody here, but if your primary response to this is YAY SUPERHERO MOVIES, you're not seeing the forest for the trees.  This is terrible for consumers and terrible for people who work in the industry, especially people who want to create things outside of the Disney content grist mill.

Marvel fans will applaud this because they really want all of the licenses under one umbrella and they only trust Disney to do the material justice.  That part is pretty good news.

Everything else is horrible for the industry.  Disney's obvious intent is to gain size so that it can compete globally with ALL media outlets including streaming services.

This is why the merger and the talk about killing the Net Neutrality regs happening at the same time should scare the shit out of everyone.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get why on paper it's terrible. At the same time. We have about a thousand more options of what to watch in 2017 than we did in 1987 or even 1997. There's way more content than I could possibly have time to consume and way more quality content to go along with the junk. Disney's shown that when they buy a property, they buy it to use it and they generally use it well. I don't think Fargo or Legion or whatever else I like on FX is going away because of this. I don't think we'll get less shows like them either. I don't think they'll make less movies. They're trying to fill niches that they don't already have. That's part of why they're doing this. On paper, less is obviously worse than more. In reality, I'm pretty sure that, as a fairly privileged consumer, this is going to work out a-ok for me. If we hit a moment where there's a big content crash in a few years and Amazon Prime/Netflix/HBO/Showtime/AMC/etc. stop making stuff all at once, that'll probably be bad, sure, but I don't see that happening. What I see instead is that it's going to become easier and easier for low-budget independent things to pop up on their own (net neutrality may stop that though, right? Let's see where that goes. Everyone under the age of 30 is up in arms about this like almost no single issue I've seen in my life). My kid would rather watch RWBY than Star Wars: Rebels, Agents of SHIELD, Flash or The Gifted. Hell, he'd rather watch someone talk about RWBY on youtube than watch a lot of those things, and he's inclined towards them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think those jobs are going away because Disney wants to be big and someone has to be around to get all of that work done.

The problem will be the policy weight that Disney will be able to throw around thanks to its resources and reach.

With Net Neutrality possibly about go bye bye, companies like Disney, Amazon, and Netflix will be looking to impose their will in the war of whose content shows up first on your browser.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And I get that it could have an impact on salaries and creative control and everything else, sure. I probably should worry more about the sort of livelihood a rigger is making on general principle. And yeah, the whole thing about Disney strong-arming how Episode VIII was shown in theaters seemed pretty bad, but I still think the math is going to work out pretty well for most consumers. If I'm wrong, someone can come back in a couple of years and make me watch five indie movies or something. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, odessasteps said:

Or 5 dick Powell movies. 

A-ok if they're musicals. If he's trying to be hard boiled, that's just mean. 

I get that it's not really the point either, but Mark bringing up Dick Powell made me think of Richard Diamond. There's a lot of content out there right now that people barely even touch. I got sick of wrestling podcasts and am listening to the old Rocky Jordan radio show on my commute. It's a lot of fun once you get to episode 3 (the first two are from an earlier version): https://archive.org/details/RockyJordan

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are absolutely going to be fewer scripted shows because of this deal.  Fox Television as we know it is gone whenever this is all said and done.  The economics of TV now are such that there is no money in it unless a network is producing and owning its shows, so they can collect all the back-end money on syndication/streaming/physical media/whatever else.  Well, Fox doesn't have a production studio anymore, so owning their own shows is out the window.  And they're not going to throw money away, airing expensive TV shows at a loss for the public good.

So bye bye, Fargo and Brooklyn 99.  Hello, cheap reality TV, syndicated shows, old movies, sports, and news.

Its going to be a real shame losing FX as we know it, which, along with HBO, was really the vanguard of this era of TV.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, J.T. said:

I don't think those jobs are going away because Disney wants to be big and someone has to be around to get all of that work done.

The problem will be the policy weight that Disney will be able to throw around thanks to its resources and reach.

With Net Neutrality possibly about go bye bye, companies like Disney, Amazon, and Netflix will be looking to impose their will in the war of whose content shows up first on your browser.

Net Neutrality is a red herring and half the shit people are talking about aren't going to happen.

 

The real worry is Google and CenturyLink's real estate practices and that they're trying to buy up all major Telco and Data Center hubs.  That's the real problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, EVA said:

There are absolutely going to be fewer scripted shows because of this deal.  Fox Television as we know it is gone whenever this is all said and done.  The economics of TV now are such that there is no money in it unless a network is producing and owning its shows, so they can collect all the back-end money on syndication/streaming/physical media/whatever else.  Well, Fox doesn't have a production studio anymore, so owning their own shows is out the window.  And they're not going to throw money away, airing expensive TV shows for the public good.

So bye bye, Fargo and Brooklyn 99.  Hello, cheap reality TV, syndicated shows, sports, and news.

Its going to be a real shame losing FX as we know it, which, along with HBO, was really the vanguard of this era of TV.

Honest question: why was ABC paying to air something that Fox made like This is Us?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...