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Kevin Wilson

Collecting and Selling Sports (and Wrestling!) Cards

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I had absolutely no idea where to put this, but since it is a bit of a passion of mine I wasn't sure if I was the only one since I can't recall it ever being talked about here.

I do the somewhat difficult combination of re-selling cards while collecting cards at the same time. Kinda like a drug dealer that does drugs. Usually I'll buy a few boxes of higher end wrestling or football cards, keep my personal favorites, and then sell everything else to re-coup my cost (in theory). 75% of the time or so I am able to per shipment I get, unless the best card in the box is one I keep which makes re-selling the rest for a profit difficult (I pulled an Asuka autograph in 2016 WWE Topps, which of course I kept) or I just get a bad hit box. So a lot of cool cards come across my desk but most don't stay there :) I am not making this thread as a way to sell the cards but most will be on Ebay. Unless its a Buffalo Bills player (shut up), Asuka, Sting, Vader... or Shawn Michaels. Or Liger.

All that was an introduction to me showing off 2016 Topps WWE Undisputed! I just got my box today. Every box costs between $190 and $200 (I got it during a pre-order so only paid $180), and each box has ten hits (six autographs, two autograph relics, and two relics). Plus low serial base cards. So the boxes are expensive but pack a punch, and to me this is the best looking design all year for wrestling cards so I tend to go all out. At first I thought my box was a bust, which happens. These were my early pulls (just spoilering for the size of the pictures):

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Getting two Strowman is just brutal, plus it wasted a low serial, and no one cares about Crews so an auto/relic was wasted (although it should still sell in the $20 range). The Itami is a base serial /10, so it should have some value, but no idea how much. Then in my 9th pack, and last pack with an autograph, I pulled this bad boy and the box was saved!

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That should sell in the $75 to $100 range, so making a profit on the box will be a non-issue. As for what I am keeping, I got a base /99 Asuka and a base /99 Sting, so those go on my personal shelf.

Spoiler

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So, anyone else collect sports or wrestling cards? As anyone that follows me on Twitter knows, I got about ten boxes of the 2016 Leaf Wrestling with some really rare autographs, and I famously sold a Blake Bortles card last fall for $250 which doesn't seem possible. Its a fun hobby as its like playing the lottery but with a much better chance of me 'winning' something, either a nice card for my collection or a nice card to sell for a profit.

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Didn't know 2016 was out I bought several packs of 2015 on ebay plus some autographs and NXT cards as well. At the Rumble this year (Evolve 54) I got Jason Jordan to sign his card and he had no idea that he had a card thus he took a picture to post on Twitter!

I also collect Football and some Baseball.

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I have mostly speed collecting outside of two sets :

 

-  2003 Press Pass football (working on a master set; if you ever see unopened of this, holler!) 

- 2001 Atomic Prism Patch Variation - all the patch cards.  Have nearly all - the ones I need I haven't seen on Ebay in over 2 years

I still love to read and talk about cards though.  Just finished reading the book "Bubble Gum Card War" and read the PSA and Net54 boards daily. 

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Full disclosure: I am an ex card shop owner and pretty much filled with bitterness toward the hobby. I hate grading services, fancy chase cards, autograph authenticators (most of whom don't know shit from a good grade of peanut butter), and the rest of the parasitical slime that ruined the hobby... Now with that out of the way, some of these new wrestling cards are pretty cool, though I am really not a fan of the cloth swatches or bat chips or whatever flotsam and jetsam is being used to create an artificial rarity.

Okay, having been out of it a few years, I'm guessing that the general format now is to have multiple sets of the same card in varying degrees of scarcity, much like what is done in limited edition books or art prints. Correct me if I'm wrong on any of this but it looks to me like a typical wrestling product comes out something like this: Set of 250 cards includes subsets of Living Legends of WWE (20 cards) Living Legends of WCW (20 cards) Living Legends of Lucha (10 cards) Current Superstars of WWE/NXT (200 cards).

Basic card = no designation as to number printed, could be millions. The subsets are somewhat scarcer, but anyone buying a box ought to have a set plus. The basic set is a mix of portrait poses and action shots.

Front Row = Same as basic card, but glossy 1 of 10,000

Pressbox = Also glossy like Front Row but with different photo (all portrait shots) serially numbered 1-1000

Executive Suite = As above with autograph added! Serially numbered 1-250

Da Pay Windah = As above with addition of cloth swatch from t-shirt. Serially numbered 1-100

Main Event = As above but with different photo. Serially numbered 1-50

Legends House = As above but limited to ten sets!

WWE Explosion = Different photo, (all are portrait shots with a pyro background), includes all the bells and whistles as "Da Pay Windah" 1 of 1

This the sort of thing that they are doing now? I actually find little fault with this concept as the collector can choose their comfort zone and have a complete set of whatever level they opt for . Nothing frosts me more than shit like "high numbers",(otherwise known as "it's rare and expensive because we say so"). Most of you are too young to remember this, but Topps was doing this shit back in the 1960s, they printed nice large sets, (no problem with that). They also released the cards in "series" with like series 1-4 being released on opening day and shipping through June when series 5 is released. Does that mean all the new boxes contain series five cards (#400-499)? Don't be silly, Topps incorporates series five into the pre-existing mix of series 1-4. You can see that there are going to be a lot less of series five cards. A LOT LESS. Ship through July, rinse, repeat in August with series six (500-599) and finally add in 60 rookies as series seven shipping in September through October. Also make this available as a factory set as many retailers want the baseball stuff off their shelves so that they can get to displaying Football and Basketball cards. 

Would you believe that Topps has been pulling this nonsense going all the way back to 1952? I'd have to ask someone that really knows the old tobacco cards like Tabe, but it wouldn't surprise me a bit if there weren't artificial scarcities in the T-206 set. Matter of fact, I think the story of the Honus Wagner card being short=printed because of Wagner's objections to tobacco has been pretty much debunked, so is it a case of early creation of a rarity?

 

 

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Yea that is basically what they are doing. Another big thing recently that has exploded is guaranteed hits. The days of getting a box of cards and getting no autographs/relic cards is completely gone, any box that costs more than $25 is going to have at least one hit in it. The standard now is two hits her box for normal sets. But lower and lower serial autographs have been popular for a bit, which is nice since if money is tight you can afford the /299, but if you are a big fan of a certain wrestler/player then you can collect them all. For 2016 Leaf Wrestling I have the Liger autograph not serial numbered, /50, /25, /10, and /5. All are different colors so they look pretty on my shelf.

I don't like card graders either, I never do it and never buy cards that are graded, its dumb. So we are on the same page there ;)

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Yeah, I started as a serious collector in my twenties (replacing all the stuff I had sold off when I discovered girls, beer, and other mind-altering things in the previous decade), so I need some twit to charge me $25 to tell me that a card is EX-Mint + with 65/35 l to r centering and 50/50 t to b centering like I need to watch a wrestling fed run by Dixie Carter and Billy Corgan.

Autographs? Buy from someone that you have reason to trust or get them in person. I used to get most of my current stuff from an umpire's brother or son (I forget which), the umpire would basically get all the players during spring training and the relative did the selling, sure they could slip a fake one in there every so often and no one would know, but why bother? Lots of retired players are very good about signing stuff through the mail (use common sense, a first ballot HOFr is likely still swamped with requests years after their playing days and very likely to use an autopen or the services of their secretary. The guys that are real assholes like Willie Mays, well, you'll hear the stories. (Basically, Mays considers anything sent to him to be a gift and sells it to a local card shop. SASE? He steams the stamps off to use for his own correspondence.) On the other hand, the guys that were good but not necessarily HOF caliber might surprise you. I had delightful correspondence with Joe Adcock and Joe Hauser as a result of writing to them. Adcock refused to sign the card I sent from the Ted Williams Card Company as they never paid him promised monies, but he sent a signed 8 x 10 instead. The licensed cards (Topps & Fleer) he signed. Joe Hauser not only signed the Exhibit Card I sent him, he stuffed the envelope full of xeroxes of press clippings, really nice old guy, in his eighties he would still show up to work at his hardware store (though I get the impression that "work" consisted of sitting around talking baseball with local fans.) Collecting autographed cards can be a fantastic hobby if you use some commonsense (if it seems like a rip-off, it probably is, always weigh the risk/reward factor, it's an unforgiving hobby, someone gets caught selling forgeries once and they are effectively done... Is a guy going to risk his business selling fakes of Alvin Davis and Jay Buhner for five bucks each? Probably not. Will some shyster try to off-load a case of supposedly game-used bats signed by Mickey Mantle? Well, now yu're getting into the high reward territory where a smart customer demands (in a nice way) to hear the story behind this lot. This simply isn't the kind of thing that ANYONE is likely to have. Consider the era, teams in the 1950s & 1960s were a lot more stingy with equipment than in the present day where a player might go through dozens of bats in a season. So, first off, it's an odd item to even exist due to quantity. Secondly, are we to believe that this lot of items by arguably the most popular player to ever wear the pinstripes has survived intact for at least five decades? Really? Really? All "game-used"? Again, the story doesn't make sense. Lastly, who could have obtained such a thing? Obviously, the only people that would have been able to put together a case of "game-used" Mantle bats would be the equipment manager or Mantle himself and this is where common sense causes the story to fall apart. Unless these are all cracked, they would be considered usable equipment and removal of same from the clubhouse would be "theft" in the case of the equipment manager. Is the reward high enough to jeopardize a position like that? A position wherein the individual is likely legit gifted with more stuff than they could ever sell? Nope, does not compute. Okay, how about the player involved? I'll be the first to acknowledge that there are plenty of players in the game who can spot a revenue stream from a mile away and will leap at the chance to increase cash-flow. As a rookie, Mark McGwire earned a small fortune through memberships to the Mark McGwire fan club, membership in same allowed you to get fantastic deals on "rare" minor league cards, signed 8 x 10s and so on... Anyone that has met McGwire knows that he is far from a dumb jock, rather he is a sharp businessman who was able to maximize earnings during his playing career and has done very well for himself after the Show. Now is there anyone that has met Mr. Mantle that comes away with the same feeling? Not bloody likely. The idea that Mantle would have the foresight to save memorabilia from his career for later sale is just absurd, his mind just didn't work that way.

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I don't do Graded cards either I think I have two since that's the only way I ever saw the card in person (A Randy Moss RC and a Bryce Harper RC).

Bought 2 packs of 2016 Topps WWE Undisputed last night on Ebay from a store I'm bought my WWE packs or cards from this year.

I bought a Hobby Box of 2016 WWE Topps I pulled a sweet Sasha Banks relic card from NXT Takeover Brooklyn and a Ric Flair autograph.

 

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I don't give a fuck about any sport other than baseball, but I love cards from any sport, Just a nifty little thing to look at and flip through. I miss the days of buying wax packs and multipanel cellos and building sets over the course of a few months, and then going to the card shop and digging through commons boxes from past years just to see if there was something I wanted to spend .02 on. As the years have gone by and now card numbers per pack have been shrunken by 5 or 6 cards, and the prices per pack are kind of ridiculous, I don't really buy them anymore. I will grab a handful of the discount Topps packs at the dollar store on occasion, because I try to put a Dodgers team set together every year. 

I still have a decent handful of full sets, both factory boxes and ones I compiled myself. I remember that Topps seemed to always short me at least 20-30 cards in their factory set, so it always seemed like I was writing them a letter and complaining. They were always very good about sending me the missing cards, so I thought that was pretty cool of them.

As for wrestling cards, I didn't know that they were still being made. The ones you posted are pretty good-looking, though. My favorite WWF cards were the 1990 Classic sets, I would buy a full set of both series 1 or 2 if I ever came across it somewhere. 

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The more likely story with Wagner is that he was stiffed on payment and demanded his card be pulled. 

1933 Goudey, however, is a famous example of fake rarity. Except instead of short-printing the Nap Lavoie, they just didn't print it at all. Only got sent to people who complained. 

I don't believe was manipulating scarcity in the early 50s. If they were, they weren't doing it right - they dumped tons of 52 Topps into the ocean. 

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I have a love/hate relationship with the Topps Triple Threads set. On the one hand, they have some really nice triple autos, booklets (a personal favorite of mine, cards that open like a book and have up to six autographs/jerseys on them), and various low serial number combinations of everything. On the other hand, since every pack has at least one high end card, there are so many variations that getting a low serial card doesn't feel special. I mean I could pull a triple jersey autograph but it feels same old since so many packs had triple jersey autographs. It also hurts their value, from this set people only want the top players, just having a rookie jersey auto card doesn't make it worth something like it would in other sets where such cards are more rare. To show what I mean, here are most of the 'hits' from the three boxes I got this weekend:

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So everything is serial numbered, I got two cards as low as ten. The top three on the left side are what the 'base' jersey relic rookie cards look like but they came in various serial numbers. The Cristine Michael is the most valuable variant of the ones I pulled, but a shitty player (no offense to him). And I got no Bills cards (Spiller in a triple jersey with other players doesn't count). On top of that, the best card I got overall was a redemption so I have to pray that Topps still has some, its a base rookie of DeAndre Hopkins /50. So yea. But nice looking cards anyway.

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On 7/9/2016 at 4:37 PM, Tabe said:

The more likely story with Wagner is that he was stiffed on payment and demanded his card be pulled. 

1933 Goudey, however, is a famous example of fake rarity. Except instead of short-printing the Nap Lavoie, they just didn't print it at all. Only got sent to people who complained. 

I don't believe was manipulating scarcity in the early 50s. If they were, they weren't doing it right - they dumped tons of 52 Topps into the ocean. 

Everything I've read about Wagner leads me to concur with your version of the story. He was very careful with his money.One story repeated by enough old-timers to lend it an air of truth is that after retiring as a player, Wagner's usual routine was to pop into a bar frequented by players and fans and drop a silver dollar on the bar making as much noise as possible and ordering a beer. Of course, people would glance over when they heard the coin clatter on the bar and see that the great Honus Wagner was standing there. Needless to say, the silver dollar didn't get broken, there were plenty of people on hand wanting to buy the HOFr a beer. After a time, Wagner would thank his hosts, and proceed down the street to the next watering hole where the performance would be repeated...

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I just purchased a case of WWE Undisputed because I found it for a good price ($162 per box, retail is $200 a box), so I'll have a whole lot of cool looking wrestling cards very shortly. God I hope I get some good pulls.

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I figure I am allowed to spam a thread I started, but the box of WWE Disputed I got today was very Diva-centric. Which is good since Diva cards sell well. It is a great design though.

Spoiler

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I have no idea what Becky's signature is. One nice thing about this set is most the autographs are on-card autographs, and not sticker autographs. I really don't like sticker autographs, it is unavoidable in most sets so I appreciate the sets that are on-card. It is just much nicer to look at.

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So after seeing this thread the other day, I decided collecting wrestling cards would be something fun my daughter and I could do together to further her love of wrestling.  So I ordered a box of what I'm guessing are just the standard WWE 2016 Topps cards from Amazon.  They came today and we had a good time opening them.  The box came with one relic card:

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It's listed as 021/199.  Obviously, my daughter was very excited the "special" card was John Cena, so we're definitely keeping this one.  I did tell her I thought we could probably buy a box a month or something(at least until we complete the set) since they only run $20 a box.  So I'm curious where I would find values on the relic cards from this set should we end up with a more rare one or a desirable relic of a wrestler she's not a fan of to possibly recoup some of the money spent on the boxes.  I remember Beckett being the end all, be all of pricing guides for sports cards 25 years ago when I was collecting various cards--is there any sort of resource out there or do you just gauge value by what cards are moving for on Ebay?

 

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Nice card :)  I am not sure if anyone uses Beckett anymore, it still exists but their values are always too high. Ebay is the best place to gauge real values, you can search for a card and then click the box on the bottom left that says "Sold listings" for what they actually sell for.

A lot of cards these days come two ways: Retail and Hobby. The box that you got is Retail, Retail boxes are cheaper and are ideal for the casual collector (which your daughter would obviously count as) and are great since it allows people that want some cards to get some without spending $50+ on the box. The downside of Retail boxes is the chances of getting a card with notable value is really really slim. If you pull something that is serial /10 or less that will have value, but generally speaking the retail boxes have really low odds of pulling a valuable card. The Hobby version of 2016 Topps WWE sells for $54 a box and has two hits (usually autographs), just for comparison sake.

If it helps any, relic cards notoriously have very little value across all sets, since it isn't nearly as special as an autograph. For example, I got a Dolph Ziggler /175 relic in a box of cards that sells for $200, and I am hoping to get $5 for it. I still have several in my own collection, I think they are fine cards but their re-sell value is minimal.

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58 minutes ago, Kevin Wilson said:

I figure I am allowed to spam a thread I started, but the box of WWE Disputed I got today was very Diva-centric. Which is good since Diva cards sell well. It is a great design though.

  Reveal hidden contents

iSTip7Q.jpg

I have no idea what Becky's signature is. One nice thing about this set is most the autographs are on-card autographs, and not sticker autographs. I really don't like sticker autographs, it is unavoidable in most sets so I appreciate the sets that are on-card. It is just much nicer to look at.

That's her auto BL looks the same as last year.

 

31 minutes ago, gatling said:

So after seeing this thread the other day, I decided collecting wrestling cards would be something fun my daughter and I could do together to further her love of wrestling.  So I ordered a box of what I'm guessing are just the standard WWE 2016 Topps cards from Amazon.  They came today and we had a good time opening them.  The box came with one relic card:

  Reveal hidden contents

20160711_175804_zpsry2nb0ul.jpg

 

It's listed as 021/199.  Obviously, my daughter was very excited the "special" card was John Cena, so we're definitely keeping this one.  I did tell her I thought we could probably buy a box a month or something(at least until we complete the set) since they only run $20 a box.  So I'm curious where I would find values on the relic cards from this set should we end up with a more rare one or a desirable relic of a wrestler she's not a fan of to possibly recoup some of the money spent on the boxes.  I remember Beckett being the end all, be all of pricing guides for sports cards 25 years ago when I was collecting various cards--is there any sort of resource out there or do you just gauge value by what cards are moving for on Ebay?

 

You can buy a retail box from Walmart or Target for $20. Walmart boxes carry a chance of exclusive Brock Lesnar Autographs only available there.

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28 minutes ago, Hail Sabin said:

You can buy a retail box from Walmart or Target for $20. Walmart boxes carry a chance of exclusive Brock Lesnar Autographs only available there.

 

Thanks.  I looked at Walmart's website and saw the Brock box as well as the retail box I got from Amazon.  The Brock box has one less card per pack which seems odd, but it does come with the guaranteed relic card as well, which is cool.  I will definitely have to buy a box there soon.

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Cool, I was hoping someone would start a card topic.

I just recently got back into collecting. Helped my parents declutter their basement last summer and took home my childhood collection. Like a lot of kids of the late 80s-early 90s, I was crazy into collecting during the bubble days. I have well over 15 000 cards, from the late 70s to the early 90s. I stopped collecting around 94, as the average set became so onerous and sub set heavy that collecting started to seem like a chore, rather than an enjoyable past time.

Bringing them home last August started as a simple organizing and collating project, that quickly led to the bug for collecting again. Mostly I wanted to finish collecting every 1980s Topps baseball and O Pee Chee hockey sets. I figured it would be a several year project, but through ebay and comc.com I've managed to get nearly everything. For baseball, I'm just missing a couple traded sets and 1980 (though I already have the Rickey Henderson rookie), as for hockey I'm just short 7 cards from the 79-80 set (I have no expectation of ever getting the Gretzky rookie).

My favourite buy was picking up a near complete 85-86 O Pee Chee set with a gorgeous Mario Lemieux rookie for under $150 on ebay, because the seller had a misspelling in the title and I was one of only 2 bidders. It was only missing a few commons, that I was able to grab for change from a local shop.

I'm now working on finishing all the random sets that I've never completed for one reason or another, mostly things like early 90s Leaf and Upper Deck sets. When I did my organization, I dumped something probably like 2000 cards, mostly do to humidity damage or being worthless common doubles (I basically reduced everything down to one master set). comc has been such a great resource for this, though some people's pricing is kind of whack. I don't know what you're thinking, $99 Andy Moog rookie guy.

Not terribly interested in collecting modern cards, though I'm going to make an exception and pick up a box or two of this year's Allen and Ginter set when it comes out later this month, those cards are always gorgeous.

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11 hours ago, gatling said:

 

Thanks.  I looked at Walmart's website and saw the Brock box as well as the retail box I got from Amazon.  The Brock box has one less card per pack which seems odd, but it does come with the guaranteed relic card as well, which is cool.  I will definitely have to buy a box there soon.

Your welcome if you buy a $5 rack pack it has a coupon it in for next time you can save $3 off a $20 box.

 

My undisputed packs came yesterday got a Alberto Del Rio Auto relic numbered to 25 and a Kevin owens relic numbered to 175 wish those two were flipped.

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Well, I quit with the baseball cards the last year of Fleer Ultra. I keep meaning to trim everything down to one set a year from 1975 to whenever that last Ultra set came out and maybe just keep my favorite player files and fill those in... I guess that I vaguely knew that they were still making wrestling cards, although without this thread I'd have never known that there's an autographed card of Finn Balor as the Demon and that I badly need one. The fact that there will likely be an English-language Nakamura card sooner rather than later makes me positively giddy. I see that there's an action figure of Finn as Demon, there goes thirty bucks... Disappointed to see that the Japanese Nakamura figure that runs about eighty bucks doesn't even look like him. Just as well, Mrs. OSJ has never grasped the concept that custom and/or rare action figures are not "toys" and an eighty dollar purchase would get me the stink-eye to be sure.

 I have a bunch of custom figures of Golden Age superheroes and old-school Marvel villains displayed with my Archives and Masterworks volumes in the living room. I won't say how much they all cost, but they weren't cheap... When we have visitors the display gets dismissed with "I wish John wouldn't leave his toys in the living room..." 

 

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Since I have been collecting consistently since around 1989 (I was six... I stated early), it has been fascinating to see how the hobby has changed. Over the years the 'hot' items and what people collection has changed so dramatically. I remember in the early 90s I purchased a David Justice Leaf RC for around $40, which was like $500 in little kid money, because base rookie cards were the thing. That was back when Griffey and McGwire rookie cards were selling for hundreds of dollars, when you opened a pack what you wanted was that hot rookie. (people did and still do collect full sets, although I see less of it now than I did in the 90s)

But that bubble burst as people realized that Topps made so many of these cards that they weren't actually rare. No rookie card from the 80s or 90s is worth shit (I didn't go look up every single one but the sought after Griffey card at the time now sells for $20 ungraded as does a 1983 Dan Marino). So then people started collecting serial numbered cards, which at least then you knew they were rare. Then it was the autograph cards. I remember when an autograph card came in 1 out of every 400 packs, my first ever autograph card I pulled was a Marvin Harrison in 1996, and rookie autographs were the big items. 

Then Topps etc. realized people really just wanted really low serial cards (every set has 1/1 cards now) and autographs/relics, so starting in I guess 2012 or so just about every box that cost at least $20 had a guaranteed 'hit'. Somewhere around that time card markers started catering to adults with money and boxes started appearing that cost $200 to $1,500, sometimes with less than ten cards per box. But boy the cards they promised you for spending that. So now, it isn't even special to get an autograph, everyone gets an autograph, the goal is to get a low serial autograph of a popular player (still rookies mostly, one constant since the beginning of card collecting is people love a player's first card or cards). And that is ok with me, since now I am in that demographic, and they still have retail boxes for those that just want to collect casually so there are options for everyone. I'm not sure what is next, they seem to covered everything (hair cards, cut autographs from dead people, cards with eight autographs, pop culture cards, redemptions for signed bats or jerseys, etc.) but I am sure they will think of something as that is what keeps people coming back.

Now that I got that out of the way, I got two boxes of 2016 Topps UFC Knockout ($120 a box, each box has eight 'hits', four autographs and four relics), I didn't get any super hits out of it but some good cards nonetheless. Here are a sample from the two boxes for those into MMA:

Spoiler

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The "Scarlet SIgnatures" are the low serial ones, which I pulled three of. No Rousey or Conor though which is what sells well, nor any dual+ signed cards.

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Must not spend all my money, must not spend all my money.

Thoroughly enjoying reading all of this and seeing the cards you guys are pulling.  Keep up the good work.

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One of the great enigmas of card collecting... Why the fascination with the RC? I can see the argument going back to when Topps was doing series that the last series of the year might have some late-season call ups and by definition, be short-printed and thus rare. Other than that, I can think of no viable argument in favor of a RC... I mean really, wouldn't you rather have the player's LAST CARD which by definition would feature the most complete stats? Let's face it, there is no intrinsic whatsoever in a baseball card, all it has to sell as an object is scarcity, presentation, and/or information. A RC might score well in scarcity and presentation, but it's going to suck in terms of information. I don't care what the price guides say, I'd rather have Mark McGwire's last regular issue card than that stupid Olympics "pre-RC". Nowhere is the fascination with RCs more misplaced than in the contrasting values of the 1952 Topps and 1969 Topps Mickey Mantle cards. Yeah, the 1952 is a high-number and worth thousands according to the guides. On the other hand, the 1969 Mantle tells the story of the Yankees-dominated game of the 1950s and 1960s. Yeah, one card with its' story of one man's career is a microcosm of the whole sport, I'd rank that as considerably more interesting and valuable than the 1952 RC.

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I mentioned I think that I ordered a case of WWE Undisputed, which means I got 64 signed cards. I won't scan them all of course but I did want to show this. One thing they started doing a few years ago was putting printing plates into packs. I don't understand the card making process but my understanding is they have printing plates of different colors to make the cards, then once they are done they put the thin metal printing plates themselves into the packs as "1 of 1" cards. They aren't true 1/1 though, because even though Asuka may have a 1/1 Yellow printing plate she will also have a 1/1 Magenta printing plate, etc as four different plates are used to make a card (yellow, magenta, black, and cyan). The real issue to me is they are ugly, I don't like them, and most people agree with me as printing plates sell poorly for a 1 of 1 unique card. I'll show you what I am talking about:

Spoiler

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The first card is a printing plate. The second card is a signed printing plate (autograph is on the card, not 'printed' also). And the third card is a true 1/1 base card, in this case the 1/1 base cards are red. The base card 1/1 has the most value since they look like real cards, then the signed printing plate, and finally the regular printing plate will probably sell for $10.

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