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RIP Robin Williams


dogwelder
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This was one of those surreal moments for me, because someone at my TV station told me out of the blue, and I couldn't find any evidence of it online anywhere, so I assumed it was a hoax, and then after about ten minutes it was everywhere.

 

I've talked to a lot of people about it tonight and he touched so many people for so many generations to the point that you can pretty much tell their age from their favorite Robin Williams performance.  For people older than me, it was Mork and Mindy & Popeye, for my generation it was Dead Poets Society or Good Morning Vietnam, for people a few years younger it was Mrs. Doubtfire or Hook. 

 

I'll vote the first half of Moscow on the Hudson as his greatest performance.  In retrospect, it's almost like watching him attain that happiness that perhaps he never truly had.

 

But goddamn, World According to Garp, Insomnia, One Hour Photo, fucking ALADDIN, and one film not mentioned that is completely underrated 1983's The Survivors.  Such a fucking talent, and so fucking sad that despite all that he brought to the world, it just wasn't enough.

 

 

Thank God everyone has seemingly made an unspoken agreement not to speak of Patch Adams or Jack.

 

True story.  I asked a close friend of mine what his favorite Robin Williams movie was.  He said "Patch Adams."  Without hesitation, I said "ARE YOU FUCKING KIDDING ME?  What is WRONG with YOU?"  He switched to Awakenings.

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His passing also made me realize how much I LOVED Robin Williams as a kid. I loved Mork and Mindy, and along with Back to the Future and the Goonies, I think I drove my parents crazy by incessantly watching Popeye.

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I loved his films from when I was a kid and enjoyed pretty much any little thing I saw him in from the past ten years or so. Its disappointing to hear he passed in such a manner and at such a an age. I especially feel sorry for his family.

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I politely dissent from an earlier poster.  I think it's a great time to watch World's Greatest Dad.  Excellent, funny movie, and I think it could be cathartic.  But of course, to each his/her own.

 

Has his mental state been reported as pure depression rather than bipolar?  I would think he would be a classic case for bipolar, but then I'm no professional.

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He has perhaps the best cameo in the history of Louie.

 

Robin Williams: Live on Broadway is one of the greatest standup acts of all time.

 

His performance in Good Will Hunting fucking makes that movie.

 

I could go on. Others definitely have.

 

But man alive. I'm just stunned by this. Absolutely heartbroken.

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His Carnegie Hall performance from the 80s is one of 2 measuring sticks for a comedian at Carnegie Hall (the other being Groucho's).

 

His film work, to me at least, seems to be up and down. For every great movie like Dead Poets Society or Good Morning Vietnam there are equally mediocre to bad movies like Toys and Patch Adams. I also seem to be the only person in my circle of friends that thinks Hook is just awful. He never got ot the point of say, Sam Jackson or Christopher Walken, where he'd just do anything but I could never see Bicentennial Man or  What Dreams May Come again and be quite content.

 

Someone mentioned Moscow On The Hudson earlier. I think it is one of his best all around performances because given the natur of the movie you'd expect him to be just a character with a goofy accent but he takes it ot the next level by making character real. The scene where he actually defects is quite awesome

 

James

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This saddens me, but it goes to show you that the things that might make you happy really don't make others happy.

 

Most people would kill for the sort of success, fame, and recognition that Robin Williams had, but it did not fill his life with the sort of joy that makes you want to keep on living.

 

I will always remember his energy, his wit, and his devotion to his craft.

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My awakening (heh) of robin was his "Oy! 10,000 years will give you such a crick in the neck" opening monologue from Aladdin. I was 12 at the time, and was finding out about the world and comedy. 

 

I.

 

Was.

 

Transfixed.

 

By the speed, precision and eloquence with which he talked. It was complete stream of consciousness that just grabbed you by the collar and didn't let go. So I had to learn more about him.

 

Cue Mork and Mindy.

Cue Live at Carnegie hall.

Cue (laer on life) his live show from NY in 2002. Cue him talking about golf. 

 

And then came Good Will Hunting. So understated, so quiet, so powerful. I cant watch the park scene without crying. That was the bit that won him the oscar, guaranteed.

 

This year has been shit for losing my comedic idols. First Rik, now Robin.

 

Goodnight vietnam. May you find peace in the next life.

 

Terrible news to wake up to. May you find your eternal rest, Robin.

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Robin's passing is very similar to how I lost my dad. Hell they were nearly the same age even so I can identify with how hard it must have been for his family and friends on the outside. You can see him slipping away and, as you reach out to help, you see the resignation in their eyes as they just pull back their hands and surrender. Depression paired with too much to drink is soul crushing for everyone involved.

 

RIP Robin

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Interestingly, Robin's death seems to be causing a number of people to be more frank about their own mental struggles. I just got done reading about Chris Gethard (who I believe is Greggulator's brother) talking about his.

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His Carnegie Hall performance from the 80s is one of 2 measuring sticks for a comedian at Carnegie Hall (the other being Groucho's).

 

His film work, to me at least, seems to be up and down. For every great movie like Dead Poets Society or Good Morning Vietnam there are equally mediocre to bad movies like Toys and Patch Adams. I also seem to be the only person in my circle of friends that thinks Hook is just awful. He never got ot the point of say, Sam Jackson or Christopher Walken, where he'd just do anything but I could never see Bicentennial Man or  What Dreams May Come again and be quite content.

 

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From Harvey Firestein's Facebook:

 

 

One of my favorite moments with Robin was flying from San Francisco to L.A. on a private jet sent for him by a film company. We spent the entire trip role playing. I was Charo and he was Cugat's chiuahuha fighting over who loved Xavier more. I had hiccups for an hour after landing. That's how much we laughed.

Please, people, do not fuck with depression. It's merciless. All it wants is to get you in a room alone and kill you. If you are feeling depressed reach out, scream out, make sure someone takes hold of you and helps until you are well enough to help yourself.

Thank you, everyone, for your messages of support as his friends and family begin to mourn this horrifying tragedy. If it's within your power, allow them to grieve in private. 

Here's to the wonderful memories of a singular friend and talent.

 

Oh my god, would I have loved to have been a fly on a wall for that flight. Very sad Robin's gone. 

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He was so, so nice to everyone in the LA Comedy scene. Always coming to shows, always staying to watch everyone and going out of his way to be present backstage and in green rooms. He would politely ask for ten minutes and then just be a ball of nerves backstage, then go up and just destroy. Just a delight to be in a room with. Pretty much every comic here has a Robin story and they're all so, so positive. 

 

I didn't have a lot of interactions with him directly, but one night he popped into a show, shook all of our hands, introduced himself, and they put him on last. He called back to and discussed everyone's set that had gone up before him. Riffing on their jokes, 'arguing' with their points. He had watched EVERYONE and really, really paid attention. I can't name very many 'higher ups' in this scene that would do anything like that. Really sad today.

 

A relative of mine used to book some comics at the local comedy club up in Marin. He was eating sushi across the street from the club and popped in afterwards. Of course he was asked if he wanted to perform after all the comics had did their time. He kindly obliged and did an hour set for about 20-25 people. Truly a class act and great comedian.

 

 

Mark Pitta and Friends?

 

A buddy of mine did a goodbye show at the Punchline in San Francisco before he moved to LA, and Bobcat Goldthwait (another class act) was going to do a set. Bobcat brought Robin, and Robin performed, did 10 minutes. My buddy was moving to be closer to his dad, who was suffering from dementia, and most of his set was about that. Afterwards Robin just gave him the biggest fucking hug and talked to him about how a brave a set it was, and just kept the hug going when my buddy broke down again. So, so cool. Such an amazing guy. 

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Interestingly, Robin's death seems to be causing a number of people to be more frank about their own mental struggles. I just got done reading about Chris Gethard (who I believe is Greggulator's brother) talking about his.

 

This interview with Greg Giraldo about depression and failure has always really resonated with me. Him going gutted me just as much.

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