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[DVDVRMC] ALIENS (Cameron, 1986)

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People complain SO much about James Cameron.  Why?  Is it the success?  I don't recall Gone With the Wind or Jaws having hipster backlashes over their Titanic/Avatar-sized business.  Is it the unsubtle metaphors mixed with treacly sentimentality?  Well, Forrest Gump certainly does have its detractors.  But Cameron seems to get this weird, specific hate over things that either shouldn't matter or things that have nothing to do with him.  Over and over again, I've heard about his "ego".  Uh.  Hello?  These are artists we're talking about.  RICH artists.  Of COURSE he's got a fucking ego, he only broke the world record TWICE for box office sales.  IT AIN'T BRAGGING IF YOU BACK IT UP.  And Cameron doesn't even seem to do very much bragging; he's not a Spielberg or a Tarantino who seem to actively enjoy coming in front of the camera and doing his own publicity.  James would rather be back in his lab, frankensteining up his newest technological innovation.  

 

And dammit, he DOES know how to tell a story.  Boy does he ever.  Okay, as he's gotten older and more successful he's also gotten more self-indulgent, more perfectionistic, and his ear for dialogue has definitely become a bit tinny.  But this director really IS a brilliant artist, I say.  And it really shows in Aliens  Have you ever heard that old cliche about a movie needing every shot to move the story along?  Like how you're supposed to edit out every extraneous or unnecessary word in a manuscript, actually.  Well, James Cameron is one of the very few filmmakers who actually DOES that.  (Most of the time.)  Seriously, try this experiment: look at pretty much any scene in this movie on a shot-by-shot basis.  Break it down.  Abuse the pause and slow motion buttons.  And LOOK at the shots, how each one is a little mini-story in of itself, a progression from the previous cut to the next cut.  There's no flab.  There's never a moment where nothing's happening.  Even in the moments where there IS nothing happening, something's still happening, some feeling is getting across to us.  

 

I beg you to track down one of the really nice special editions of this movie and watch all the bonus feature crap about how they did the effects.  1986 was still a wee bit early for CGI, so all the work here is done practically.  Models, miniatures, matte paintings, all kinds of smoke and mirrors.  Learning how they made the Power Loader work will blow your fuckin' mind.  (Spoiler: there's a big strong stuntman inside of it, Sigourney's basically standing on his shoes.)  The alien Queen is similarly complex.  Or, the facehuggers, which in this movie move around and DO stuff and are a more aggressive danger than in the original Alien, where the monster practically needed you to climb into bed with it in order to impregnate you with its chestbursting babies.  

 

Yikes, there it is, the elephant in the room: comparisons to the original.  Now, let me preface this by saying Alien is a beautiful brilliant masterpiece of a film.  And yeah, it's probably scarier than Aliens is.  But the sequel wasn't just a horror movie; of course Alien wasn't "just a horror movie", but Cameron had something different in mind.  Ridley Scott wanted his movie to concern the scifi equivalent of truckers; Cameron (ironically, a former trucker himself) had bigger dreams and a wider canvas.  He took everything the first movie did, respected the living shit out of it, repeatedly paid homage to it and used it to bring up emotional or thematic repetitions of incidents that happened in the first movie.  It's an incredibly tricky act, too, because Aliens also clearly wants to work as a standalone movie.  I saw it first before I saw Alien, and the movie still made sense to me.  But there's an extra level of metatext to be had if you're familiar with the first movie, so it works both ways.  

 

In fact, let me describe the first time I saw the movie: I was, I think, about nine or ten years old; and I was having an overnight visit with my grandmother.  She went to bed early, and I happened to see this movie was coming on TV, why not watch it... and thus my little mind was blown.  I didn't know it at the time, but this screening added in at least some of the deleted scenes that made it into the director's cut: specifically, the auto-sentry gun sequence.  (Digression: this scene is a brilliantly designed bit of tomfoolery which generate suspense out of practically nothing, just shots of the marines watching a digital readout of the guns' status and occasional super-brief glimpses of the guns doing their job.)  Halfway through the movie, I went and got my toy gun to protect myself in case any aliens tried to jump me while I was watching their movie.  And the next day, my grandmother was kind enough to pretend to listen and care as I described the entire movie to her.  

 

This movie invented a lot of shit that we take for granted.  For one thing: can anyone else name another preexisting science fiction movie in which they still use guns and bullets in The Future?  Oh, I guess Metropolis or something has probably done that at some point; but still, we're much more used to laser blasters in that sort of thing.  Making the future technology only slightly better than what we have now (aside from space travel) is a great way to drive home the human heart of the story and get the audience to empathize with the people onscreen.  

 

And what lovely people they are.  Sound off: Apone is the second-most badass drill sergeant in film history, with only R. Lee Ermy in Full Metal Jacket doing it better.  Hudson is awesome as That One Guy you always get in every workplace who makes everyone else's life miserable.  Vasquez basically invented Michelle Rodriguez.  Hicks, much like his alter-ego Kyle Reese, is a stolid protector who is more than willing to put himself between the monsters and their would-be victims.  Bishop brilliantly plays off the evil android Ash from the previous film, by basically being so open and honest and noble that he comes off as creepy and hiding something... but no, swerve, he really is that saintlike.  Newt avoids all the standard child actor cliches and is totally believable as a PTSD victim, and works well as a distilled symbol of humanity, warmth, and love.  

 

Finally, we come to the center: Sigourney Weaver.  She was nominated for a Best Actress Oscar for this part; and, really, that says a LOT.  How often does the Academy ever nominate performances from horror films?  Very damn near never, that's how often.  Yet they still did it here.  Weaver is transcendent in this, her very best performance even while wearing her very worst haircut.  We've gotten to the point where we take this amazing lady for granted, and that's incredibly goddamn sad.  I don't think I've ever seen a bad performance out of Weaver in any movie ever, she always gives it her all; but this one performance was her career-defining moment.  

 

And lastly: the aliens themselves.  Has there ever been a more brilliantly designed monster?  These things look real.  They kinda-sorta make biological sense.  We can see how they function, how their society works, what their tactics are.  We see both their strengths and weaknesses.  It's like fighting an entire army of Viet Cong vampires.  They can continually come up with ways to surprise us; alright, the Queen knowing how an elevator works seems kinda contrived, but all of their other tricks are perfectly fair and perfectly terrifying.  

 

I'll probably say more later, but this'll do for now.  

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Aliens is one of the great sci-fi movies of the 80's, a decade that was loaded with great sci-fi. It is also the sequel to the best sci-fi/horror hybrid film ever, and managing not to embarrass himself following Alien is an accomplishment all in itself. Cameron established a formula he would do even better several years later, turning the sequel of a sci-fi/horror film into a straight up action film. Weaver, of course, is a goddess of ass kicking.

Typing this on my phone sucks, so I'll stop here for now.

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You lost me at "hipster."

Read it as shorthand for "contrary people who dislike popular things" in this context.  I've never seen people so PROUD that they dislike a filmmaker than when they're talking about Cameron, and I don't get it.  At all.  The dude is possibly the single greatest director of action and spectacle in his entire generation, yet I can't begin to count the number of people I've seen whining about his alleged lack of talent as if he were Uwe Boll.  

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Cameron backlash didn't really start until Titanic, which as pretty as it was, and that it strapped a rocket onto the backs of Leo and Winslet, was a shit movie.  Its bank revolved solely around teenage girls wanting to see Leo in what they thought was a "romantic masterpiece" 26 times in an era before YouTube, DVD's, and Facebook, and guys taking their girlfriends to see the movie hoping to get at least a handjob for putting up with 3 hours of that crap afterwards.

 

Then he didn't do much of anything else aside put his name on a half decent show that got Jessica Alba on everyone's radars until Avatar, which was just a complete rehash of Dances With Wolves/The Last Samurai with a huge budget.

 

No one really bitches about what Cameron did before Titanic, which were all solid movies (Piranha 2 notwithstanding)  like Aliens.

 

Now, yeah, Scott and Cameron had different visions of the Xenomorphs.  Scott went to Geiger and created something that wasn't just scary, but it violated you in every way before you died from it.  Cameron took it a step further and made them SMART.  It wasn't just a hive structure with only self-propagation in mind, but they were highly intelligent.  They learned through trial and error.  

 

You have to watch the Special Edition to fully get this.  In the original cut, the Xeno's came through the ceiling during the big battle near the end, and it was implied they did it because they couldn't get in because of the barricades.  Where in the Special Edition, you see its because they were being stopped by the Sentry Guns (which they didn't know ran out of ammo, but they didn't take the chance), so they needed a way around.  The Xeno's were hunting the second the Marines landed.  They hid, they came through the ceilings and floors, they blocked your escape, they cut off your method of exfil, the Xeno's were the devil incarnate.

 

And then there was Ripley.  There are some that like to argue that Princess Leia broke the "females are only damsels in distress" in Star Wars, but no, it was Ripley.  She set the bar for bad ass female in sci-fi, and not many not written/directed by Whedon have come close.  

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You could argue katherine bigelow had a hand in shaping all the strong Cameron women (Ripley, Sarah Connor, ...)

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I'm not getting into the Cameron thing aside from to say that Titanic had a following WAY WAY bigger than just teenage girls. That shit hit big with women all over the country of all ages.

 

I still remember seeing Aliens for the first time, in my uncle's minivan which actually had a small TV and VCR installed in the back so my cousins could watch TV in the very early '90s when I was a kid (he is currently serving a bid in prison for fraud, heh). The advancement in technology during the passage of time... it's wild. (Side note: I recorded ECW on the Sunshine Network visiting him in Florida, and still have the tape!)

 

As far as I'm concerned there are a trilogy of great '80s sci-fi/action/horror meldings and they are

 

1. The Terminator

2. Aliens

3. Robocop

 

with Predator coming up Honorable Mention. That is about as high a praise as you can get from me for any film.

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You could argue katherine bigelow had a hand in shaping all the strong Cameron women (Ripley, Sarah Connor, ...)

I doubt it, cuz they didn't get married until 1989, long years after Cameron was already doing his thing.  More like the reverse is true, marrying Bigelow was just another symptom of him being in love with badass women.  

 

 

There are some that like to argue that Princess Leia broke the "females are only damsels in distress" in Star Wars, but no, it was Ripley.  She set the bar for bad ass female in sci-fi, and not many not written/directed by Whedon have come close.  

Leia certainly did it first, and on the largest scale imaginable.  But she did make a rather poor first impression by spending half of A New Hope sitting around waiting to be rescued.  Ripley often needed help, but generally she did her own damn self-rescuing. 

 

And there are plenty of other examples of badass scifi women throughout history, but most of 'em were fairly obscure and forgotten.  Aliens was basically the first time that it was definitively proved that an ongoing action franchise could be anchored by a female lead, without any Barbarella-style sexual objectification masquerading as "empowerment".  Ripley dressed like a dude, talked like a dude, drove heavy construction vehicles like a dude... and still kept her maternal feelings intact.  That's what separates Ripley from someone like say Barb Wire, because the latter is a shitty juvenile male fantasy of what an ideal "strong woman" might be like, while the former simply IS a strong woman.  

 

Compare how Officer Anne Lewis is treated in Robocop.  The first time we see her kicking the shit out of a guy twice her size... we don't know it's a woman yet.  They do that awful old trick where the anonymous tough guy does something awesome, and then takes off his helmet for the first time, and GASP~! its a GIRL!  "Dang, Jethro, I reckon that wimmin actually CAN kick some ass..." is how we're supposed to feel there.  It's supposed to be a surprise. And then she spends most of the film being pushed around by dudes, and aside from blowing up Ray Wise she doesn't accomplish much.  It's aimed at a world where the general population is expected to already think that women aren't supposed to be capable of these things.   

 

Ripley is not a surprise.  (Vasquez is, a little bit, but simply having this incredible buff Latin Amazon kinda felt like progress at the time.)  She's never once belittled because she's just a girl and thus expected to as useless as Firefly's Kaylee in a gunfight, or indeed as useless as Alien's whining designated victim Lambert when faced by a drooling xenomorph.  Aliens takes it for granted that nobody gives a shit about Ripleys gender, or anyone else's for that matter.  The Colonial Marines already have two or three women on the squad (one of whom pilots their ship, arguably the most important and trickiest job), the Company boardroom has female suits wearing male suits.  Nobody in the movie finds this odd; a couple of mean jokes from the soldiers are the only whiff of sexism in the whole project.  The numbers aren't quite perfect, there's still three guys for every one girl in these professional atmospheres; but let's face it, 20th Century Fox would have NEVER produced this script if there were a bunch more Action Grrlz in it.  As usual, Hollywood tends to think that white male heroes are the only thing they can sell to a wide audience.  

 

Of course, the greatest irony is that in the original script for Alien, Ripley WAS a man.  They flipped his gender pretty arbitrarily.  But then again, the original script also ended with the alien ripping Ripley's head off and then sitting down in her chair as if taking her place.  So maybe we shouldn't put too much emphasis on the beta test version.  

 

In fact, Cameron loves strong women SO much that he's nearly incapable of writing a female villain.  (Not counting the Queen, of course.)  Pretty much all his villains are men, usually caucasian, usually either wealthy industrialists or shell-shocked military commanders, usually trapped in an attitude of entitlement.  But considering how terribly Tia Carrera was treated in True Lies, maybe he SHOULDN'T be writing female villains.  He seems kinda bad at it.  (Compare how it doesn't feel weird or abusive when Harrison Ford is punching Cate Blanchett in the face during Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.)

 

 

 

 

And oh yeah, I call shenanigans and bullshit on the whole "Titanic only made money because teenage girls went to see it over and over" claim.  EVERYONE went to see Titanic, frequently over and over, regardless of age or sex.  Teenage girls didn't vote for all those Oscars it received, nor did they make up the 88% of Rottentomato critics who positively reviewed it.  Lots of peope fucking love Titanic; get OVER it already.  I fucking loved that movie, flaws and all; and feel the same way about Avatar too.  Sure, they've got ancient recycled plots and the lead actor's performance was inconsistent at best and the villains are goddamned cartoons and their budgets probably could've been spent elsewhere to solve world hunger.  And?  The REST of those movies were fucking awesome, especially from a viewpoint of sheer spectacle.  Movies are a primarily visual medium, and both Titanic and especially Avatar showed me things I'd NEVER seen before (and, in some cases, haven't seen since).  Cameron doesn't get nearly enough credit for being a truly world-class visual artist, composing and framing and lighting a marathon of incredibly gorgeous shots.  Combine those with his first-rate, second-to-none abilities with editing and pacing and sound mixing and special effects, and jesus CHRIST, James Cameron is basically the answer to "what would you get if Akira Kurosawa had been a shittier writer but still kept all his other skills?"

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Holy shit, but no Aliens is not scarier than Alien.  Alien is the far more suspenseful of the two and did not have to rely on putting a child in peril in order to drag terror out of you.  The scene where Ripley rushes to the decontamination bay to save Lambert knowing she is too late while Lambert's gurgling screams echo through the PA system is fucking bloodcurdling.  I think half of the audience in our theater left at that point and it is still a scene I have a rough time sitting through.

 

Ridley Scott understood that less was more.  So did Hitchcock.

 

Aliens does kick your ass, however, by getting you to buy in on the characters far better than Alien did. 

 

Alien builds towers of tension but you don't really feel all that emotionally vested in the crew of the Nostromo.  Aliens makes you care about the Marines (There wasn't a dry eye in the house when Vasquez and Gorman sacrificed themselves) and Jesus, who did not crack a smile when Burke got what was coming to him?

 

I honestly think that Cameron knew he had a winning douchebag of an antagonist in Burke, so he played with the audience by making Burke's demise the LEAST graphic of them all.  I felt cheated because I didn't get to see Burke torn in two.  Good form, James.

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My favourite Jim Cameron thing was when everyone was counting and praying that TDK would beat Titanic. Slowly but surely it went up and up and up.

Then Avatar came along and battered everything as quick as can be.

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Imma write a real reply, cuz this is one of my all-time favourite films, but alas, I've got marking to do. So, for now...

 

Aliens does kick your ass, however, by getting you to buy in on the characters far better than Alien did. 

 

 

To a certain point, this is true. I think that the characters are just larger. I think if you peel away the layers of nostalgia and life-long fanboydom, Bill Paxton's performance is probably a lot more campy and lame than I'll ever be willing to admit.

 

Of course, the characters in ALIEN are so static that they don't really invite identification. Except Kotto and Stanton. Those guys are fucking amazing. I love the dialogue in ALIEN; it's almost Altman-esque, especially with those two. People are constantly talking over each other. Shit, ALIEN is almost McCABE & MRS MILLER in space (aesthetically, at least, and perhaps philosophically). 

 

The thing about Ripley being a kick ass female character: obviously this is true, but her femininity isn't really emphasized until ALIENS. The series plays on her androgyny a lot. I'm pretty sure that Ripley could have been a dude in ALIEN and they wouldn't have to change a line of dialogue. 

 

I'm not mentioning that as a criticism.

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Oh for certain Kotto and Stanton are king sized but arriving into Alien in medias res didn't do me any favors.  It was cool to see a day in the life of the crew with them kvetching about the job shit that normal people gripe about and it was a nice preface of the horror to come. 

 

Even feeling somewhat detatched from the crew, the claustrophobic elements were overwhelming.  I had no real emotional attachment to the characters as people but I felt every ounce of their fear.  It was as if I was being hunted by this malevolent creature right along with them.

 

Leviathan is Alien's club-footed ADD relative because it pulls the exact same shit before the dying starts and is no where near as good of a movie.

 

At first I thought the de-mystification of the xenomorphs was a mistake, but I was wrong.  Part of the tension in Alien came from the notion that the crew couldn't really fight back as well as other people might, but the terror of Aliens came in knowing that even well armed and highly trained solders weren't really a match for these monsters.  They hit you in numbers, bled acid, were effective hunters, and did not discriminate against gender or age when they came after you and being captured alive to serve as a host was a far worse fate than just being torn to shreds.

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 but her femininity isn't really emphasized until ALIENS

 

I don't agree, mostly because in the last act of Alien she looks like a running homage to I SPIT ON YOUR GRAVE. Her femininity is always present because Sigourney Weaver never sacrifices it to play like one of the boys. What's emphasized in Aliens isn't necessarily her femininity, but an aspect to her femininity - maternal instincts.

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I haven't seen SPIT, so I can't comment, but I didn't say her femininity wasn't present; I said it wasn't emphasized. And it isn't, at least not in a typical Hollywood fashion. Can you think of a scene where her gender is given any extra attention, whether in dialogue or in mise-en-scène? Just curious. I can't, really, though admittedly it has been a while.

In contrast, her gender is really emphasized in ALIENS - not just her "maternal instincts," but her physical form and behaviour is constantly contrasted with the masculine (male or female) marines.

She's masculinized in ALIEN 3, and then both aspects of gender get emphasized in ALIEN RESURRECTION.

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I feel like having her spend the last act in her panties is emphasizing her gender. 

 

I referenced SPIT, and you don't have to see it to get this because it's the cover of the film, is because Ripley's garb at the end is similar to what the character in SPIT is left with after being raped. The connection is furthered by Ripley trying to avoid this Alien who wants to put it's little chest-exploder in side her.

 

I haven't watched it in a while, so there may be more specific emphasis, but I think the very fact that she's a female is more than enough emphasis, because it's playing on an audience's preconceived gender roles to create more fear and tension. If Ripley was played by Michael Bieihn instead, it wouldn't be nearly as scary. But because it's played by the considered "weaker sex", is a way of stacking the odds so that when she over comes them, it's that much more a triumph.

 

I fucking love the Ripley Character to death and think it's probably the most powerful model across at least the first three films, for female empowerment in cinema.

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I don't feel like the panties were much of a big deal.  Woah, they revealed more of Sigourney's freakishly large skeleton, how sexy.  And the whole thing lasts for, what, two or three minutes at best?  She fiddles around with the cat while still fully clothed, takes forever getting out of her jumpsuit in the first place, she fiddles around with some tech stuff, and then the alien suddenly makes its presence known in a brilliant jump scare (which is so awesome that even the Rifftrax for the movie features the usually-unflappable hecklers shrieking like frightened little babies) which is easily the greatest jump scare in the movie, one of the greatest in all cinematic history  Ripley thereafter quickly hustles her pantied ass into the closet, and pretty soon is all bundled up in a spacesuit.  

 

Yes, we do get three or four truly unfortunately sleazy-feeling male-gazey peeks at her asscrack and... uh... mound-crack?  At which point all I can do is shrug and sheepishly mutter "...well, 1970's horror flick, you KNOW what chances you take with those".  And Weaver is hardly known as being a shrinking violet when it comes to standing up for what she thinks is right, and she's repeatedly done nudity in several other films, so I'd assume she was probably cool with it.  That one scene is hardly equal to the second film's entire running themes of femininity and maternity and with a few tiny dashes of romance, none of which we see in the first movie... which was mostly about guys being raped and had a man give birth to a giant dick.  

 

And yeah, I might have just phrased it too weakly before, Alien is totally scarier than Aliens.  I personally was kinda spoiled by seeing the sequel first, so little in Alien came as a surprise on my first viewing.  BTW, I am a tremendous fan of pretty much the entire extended Alien(s) multimedia franchise, comics and novels and games and even some of the damn toys, so I'm more than open to chattering about any of that shit at the drop of a hat.  

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 but her femininity isn't really emphasized until ALIENS

 

I don't agree, mostly because in the last act of Alien she looks like a running homage to I SPIT ON YOUR GRAVE. Her femininity is always present because Sigourney Weaver never sacrifices it to play like one of the boys. What's emphasized in Aliens isn't necessarily her femininity, but an aspect to her femininity - maternal instincts.

 

 

Leave Her Alone YOU BITCH~! = Number One And The Best.

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So it might be true of action/adventure movies more generally, but it really strikes me that Cameron's action films are meant to be a collection of brilliantly executed set-pieces/action scenes. And each one is quite different. I mean, that's obvious at the end, when you get tunnel chase + quest for Newt + Alien queen mecha battle roar~! But it's true earlier, as well. The action keeps moving, but it doesn't seem monotonous or overwhelming (like a Michael Bay film might) because of the way he constantly switches up the situation and the characters involved. 

 

I used to think that ALIENS and TERMINATOR 2 were these two SF-action masterpieces from Cameron, but rewatching both I think ALIENS is the far stronger of the two.

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Would you like to see Aliens in a movie theater?  

 

Today?

Yes. Yes. Yes.  

 

If you are lucky enough to live anywhere near a Movie Tavern movie theater, they are presenting ALIENS as a part of their Cult Classics series.  At 7:30 PM.  

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...and it ROCKED, if I recall correctly!

 

It was frustrating that absolutely nobody wanted to take me up on my offer of going to see this movie, except for my former roommate's current roommate who lives in the room I used to live in, and is a tranny.  A non-horror-movie-loving, very sensitive, very shy tranny.  (Closest thing I've been to a date in years...)  But she actually enjoyed herself, thus proving the all-powerful effect this movie has.  I tried to pry some critique out of her, using all my "announcer leading an interview" techniques, and the best I got was: "I'm never going to watch it again... but I'm glad I saw it once."  That's a phrase I'd apply more towards movies like Men Behind the Sun, but a win is a win. 

 

And for extra oddity, just tonight I happened to converse with a female scifi scriptwriter who for some damn reason thought that Ripley was not a good strong heroine.  She categorized it as Ripley always being the back-up plan, which is an argument I can kinda see a kernel of interest in.  I'm gonna link her to this thread and try to change her mind.  

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It's been a few years since I saw this but I actually feel like Aliens is legitimately the scariest movie I've ever seen.  I'm not big on scary movies, but I loved this and found it completely fasincating and terrifying.

 

Also, gotta cop to having an unhealthy crush on Pvt. Vasquez

vasquez.jpg

 

It's funny, I looked the actress up and she doesn't feel nearly attractive in anything else, so it's apparently just a crush on Vasquez and not the actress playing her.

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Yeah, Jenette Goldstein is actually white and Jewish.  She's just THAT good an actress.  (My brother was heartbroken when I told him this; I think his crush on Vasquez partly led to him marrying his first wife, a fiery Puerto Rican.)  You've all seen her elsewhere and didn't even realize it, she was John Connor's foster mother in Terminator 2 and the Irish mom telling her son a fairy tale as the boat sinks in Titanic.  And Hudson's joke "Someone said alien, she thought they meant ILLEGAL alien and signed up" is based on a true story.   Goldstein saw she was auditioning for someone called Vasquez in a movie called Aliens, assumed it was gonna be about illegal immigrants and showed up dressed as a poor migrant worker.  

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That is such a bizarre sidenote to that film. 

 

Let us not forget her role as the older vampire gal in Near Dark. Still attractive but smoked by the impossibly cute Jenny Wright (who coincidentally now looks like the Old Witch from The Haunt of Fear).

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Sequel talk is happening!  

 

GOOD SEQUEL TALK IS HAPPENING~!

 

With Neil "District 9" Blomkamp in the director's seat!  

 

The only holdup, apparently, is Blomkamp's own insecurity.  FUCK YOU, I'LL DIRECT THE SHIT OUT OF THIS MOVIE IF YOU WON'T DO IT.  

 

LOOK AT HIS CONCEPT ART!

 

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I would sell my soul for this movie to happen and be awesome.  I'd sell my brother's soul (don't worry, he'll be cool with it) to be involved in the making of this movie.

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Can't really blame him for being insecure considering how badly he got burned on the Halo movie, which was also at Fox.

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